Faculty & Staff News, Sept. 16

Jason Keller, assistant professor, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Schmid College of Science and Technology, co-authored a paper titled “Personality type differences between Ph.D. climate researchers and the general public: implications for effective communication”, which appears in the journal Climatic Change.  This work shows that the personality type of early career climate change researchers differs from that of the general public and highlights the potential for miscommunication between these two groups.  A copy of this article is available at SpringerLink.com.

Alicia Okouchi-Guy, assistant professor, Department of Dance, College of Performing Arts, was invited to judge the 2011 – 2012 Los Angeles Clippers Spirit Professional NBA Dance Team auditions. The panel of judges included the Los Angeles Clippers Entertainment Teams Director, the Los Angeles Clippers Director of Game Entertainment, administrators from the NBA and professional athletes. The auditions were conducted over a three-day period with a total of six rounds of eliminations. The process of elimination included competitions in technique, choreography, improvisation and interview.

Donald Guy, assistant professor, Department of Theatre, College of Performing Arts, recently served as the Lighting Designer for Saint Louis Ballet’s production of Romeo and Juliet at the Touhill Performing Arts Center in St. Louis, Mo.  The production was choreographed by Artistic Director and former New York City Ballet soloist Gen Horiuchi. In May, he also served as Lighting Director for Saint Louis Ballet’s performance of Tribute, by choreographer Christopher d’ Amboise, which was presented as part of the Spring To Dance Festival 2011 sponsored by Dance St. Louis. The festival featured performances by numerous dance companies including Saint Louis Ballet, Dance Theatre of Harlem and The Joffrey Ballet.

Jason Keller, Ph.D. and Jennifer Funk, Ph.D., assistant professors, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Schmid College of Science and Technology, have received a Major Research Instrumentation grant from the National Science Foundation.  The award will be used to purchase a carbon-hydrogen-nitrogen elemental analyzer for use in research and teaching.  Carbon and nitrogen are key elements in ecological systems, and the acquired instrumentation will allow students to gain hands-on experience conducting ecological research on projects ranging from how plants respond to environmental conditions to soil development in salt marsh ecosystems.

Robin Kish, assistant professor, Department of Dance, College of Performing Arts, presented on a professional panel titled “The Future in Dance and Music Medicine/Science” at the 29th annual symposium on Medical Problems of Performing Artists held in July at Snowmass, Colo., sponsored by the international organization Performing Arts Medicine Association. In addition, two undergraduate student projects mentored by Professor Kish were presented at this conference.  Rena Nishijima (’12) presented her study on “Genu varum and genu valgum among Asian dancers in comparision to non-Asian dancers” and Whitney Kofford (’12) presented her study on “Healthy eating knowledge and habits among college dance and music majors.”  Whitney’s study was the first to incorporate dance and music majors at Chapman in a study.

Professor Kish also co-organized, with Janice Plastino of UC Irvine the inaugural “Healthy Approaches in the Training of Dancers” conference at Chapman University in conjunction with Performing Arts Medicine Association on Aug. 14.  Speakers included Nancy Kadel, M.D., an internationally recognized surgeon specializing in foot and ankle reconstruction in dancers, Chris Koutures M.D., FAAP, a pediatrician, sports medicine and performing arts specialist, and Desiree Robbins, a leading commercial industry teacher and choreographer.

Liz Maxwell, assistant professor, Department of Dance, College of Performing Arts, recently spoke on a panel titled “Reconstruction by All Available Means” held in Seattle by the Dance Critics Association. Attending the conference were preeminent critics and dance historians from many publications, including The New York Times, The Village Voice, Dance Magazine and others.  Professor Maxwell then traveled to New York to deliver a research paper written in conjunction with Professor Robin Kish. This conference was hosted by the Dance Kinesiology Teacher’s Group and was focused on sharing teaching tools and practices in Dance Science and Somatics. Their paper, “Curricular Programming to Facilitate Somatic and Anatomical Awareness in Higher Education,” discussed the rationale for and successes and challenges of creating space within the College of Performing Arts curriculum for effective collaborative programming between dance science and somatics.

Nicholas Terry, D.M., assistant professor, Conservatory of Music, College of Performing Arts , recorded four compositions with his ensemble, the Los Angeles Percussion Quartet, this August at Skywalker Sound (a Lucasfilm Co.) on the classical music label Sono Luminus.  The recording, to be released in early 2012, is one of the very first 7.1 surround-sound recordings of percussion chamber music, and will be distributed internationally to more than 60 countries via NAXOS, one of the world’s largest classical music labels.  Two of the four works were composed by Conservatory of Music faculty members Jeffrey Holmes and Sean Heim (the latter composer’s work was commissioned by the esteemed FROMM Music Foundation).  The compositions were played live at Zipper Hall in downtown Los Angeles on Sept. 10.

Tamiko Washington, associate professor, Department of Theatre, was the Artistic Director of OC-Centric, Orange County’s new play festival which was staged this August in Moulton Hall.  Professor Washington’s inspiration to create the festival stemmed from the desire to support Orange County’s playwrights with an emphasis on producing new plays.  The debut festival included the following plays:  Do Hoosiers Go to Heaven? by Eric Eberwein, In Search of Reason by Gene Fiskin, The Myth of the Cubicle by Ken La Salle, and Sex, Love &  the Premature Evacuation by Joni Ravena.  The festival featured off-Broadway directors Ray Chao and Allison Mosier, Hunger Artists Theatre resident director Jill Johnson, and Professor Washington.

Allison Benis White, adjunct faculty, Department of English, Wilkinson College, won the 2011 Four Way Books Levis Prize. Benis White was a recent Tabula Poetica Visiting Poet and a Walter E. Dakin Fellow at this year’s Sewanee Writer’s Conference. In addition to the prize, her second book will be published by Four Way Books.

Faculty and Staff News, Aug. 31

Jennifer Bevan, associate professor, Department of Communication Studies, Wilkinson College, co-authored an article that was recently published in the psychology journal Computers in Human Behavior. Her co-authors were recently graduated communication studies majors Noelle Hum, Brittany Hambright, Perrin Chamberlin, Anne Portwood, and Amanda Totman Schat. The article, entitled A Picture Is Worth a Thousand Words: A Content Analysis of Facebook Profile Photographs, reported a study that the students conducted as their senior capstone project under Dr. Bevan’s direction.

Grace Fong, D.M, director of keyboard studies, Conservatory of Music, College of Performing Arts, recently returned from her performance as soloist for An Evening in Olde Vienna” with the Indianapolis Symphony, where music critic Tom Aldridge wrote: “With K. 271 she shared one of Mozart’s supreme compositions, possibly as Mozart himself might have played it (or wished it done). Every note audible with perfect phrasing, clean articulation and delicate nuance—seemingly effortless passage and octave work in the difficult final movement . . . one sits back and goes, wow! Each time she has mesmerized with her essentially faultless playing.”

Also this month: Oscar-nominated Mike Figgis’ music video featuring Dr. Fong premiered at the Royal Opera House, London, at the 2011 Deloitte Ignite Festival.

Donald Guy, assistant professor of theatre, Department of Theatre, College of Performing Arts, has been commissioned to serve as lighting designer for the production Carnival of Wonders at The Orleans Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas, Nev. The show will feature Master Magicians Kalin and Jinger (two-time Magicians of the Year) and comedy magician Jeff Hobson.

Alicia Okouchi-Guy, assistant professor of dance, Department of Dance, College of Performing Arts, was offered an amazing opportunity from dance icon and living legend Donald McKayle to create the first ever Chapman/UC Irvine Dance Exchange. Mr. McKayle, Artistic Director of UCI Etudes Dance Ensemble, invited her to co-produce an evening of concert dance hosted at UCI. This Chapman/UC I coproduced concert showcased a select group of dancers from the dance departments of Chapman University and UCI. The highlight of the concert was the first ever collaborative endeavor combining Chapman University dancers with UCI dancers to perform Mr. McKayle’s masterpiece “Rocks and Gravel” from Rainbow ‘Round My Shoulder. This masterpiece was performed by seven male dancers and one female dancer. Chapman students included Chris Babcock (’14), Christopher Carvalho (’14), Joe Chantry (’14), Derek Nemechek (’13) and DJ Ortiz (’12).

Also: Professor Okouchi-Guy has been elected to the American College Dance Festival National Board of Directors Baja Region. Professor Okouchi-Guy also attended the American College Dance Festival hosted by the University of California, Long Beach. She taught a master class in commercial jazz and presented two pieces of her choreography that were performed in the Martha B. Knoebel Dance Theater.

Ramesh Singh, Ph.D., professor, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Schmid College of Science and Technology, attended IUGG General Assembly held in Melbourne, Australia June 27 – July 7. Dr. Singh organized “Union Symposium on Grand Challenges in Natural Hazards” during IUGG General Assembly and chaired a session titled Earth on the Edge – Recent Pacific Rim Disasters.

Dr. Singh also presented two scientific papers at a symposium organized by the International Association of Hydrological Sciences and International Association of Cryospheric Sciences at the IUGG General Assembly.

In July Dr. Singh he was elected as one of the five new members of the EMSEV Bureau for a term of four years.

Pilar M. Valenzuela associate professor, Department of Languages, Wilkinson College, recently visited the Department of Linguistics at UCLA to deliver a talk at the colloquium on Amerindian languages led by Prof. Pam Munro. The presentation discussed a series of verb-related mechanisms available in the grammar of Shiwilu, a critically endangered language of Peruvian Amazonia. Dr. Valenzuela’s research is based on the analysis of original data that she gathered from native speakers in the field, thanks to the support of NSF grant BCS-0853285.

Faculty and Staff News, Aug. 2

Stephen Berens, assistant professor, Department of Art, Wilkinson College, was one of 150 art professionals from around the United States brought to San Francisco to attend the Andy Warhol Foundation’s Warhol Initiative Convening June 21-26. The Warhol Convening is meant to foster deep discussion and critical thinking around emerging trends, current challenges, and the future of artist-centered culture. Professor Berens was invited because of his experiences as one of the co-founders and editors of the art journal X-TRA.

Micol Hebron, assistant professor, Department of Art, Wilkinson College, has curated an exhibition of 26 contemporary artists from Utah. The exhibition, titled “West of Center”, opened at Jancar Gallery in Los Angeles’ Chinatown, on July 16th and continues through Aug. 6.Professor Hebron has been on professional leave for the past year while she has served as Senior Curator of Exhibitions at the Salt Lake Art Center in Salt Lake City. The “West of Center” exhibition represents a summary of the artists she has encountered in Salt Lake City during the last year. An unprecedented survey of Contemporary Utah art, 12 of the artists will be present at the opening, and 2 of them will present performance art pieces.

In association with West of Center, Professor Hebron also led a panel discussion at Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions July 17th.

Jason Keller, assistant professor, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Schmid College of Science and Technology, recently returned from a joint meeting of the Society of Wetland Scientists and the International Wetland Biogeochemistry Symposium in Prague, Czech Republic.  Dr. Keller presented a talk entitled, “Humic substances as key regulators of methane dynamics across an ombrotrophic-minerotrophic peatland gradient,” in a session which he organized.  During the meeting he also took over the elected position of Chair of the Biogeochemistry Section.

Anna Leahy Ph.D., associate professor of English and her husband, Leatherby Libraries associate librarian Douglas Dechow, Ph.D., authored an article about the Roger and Roberta Boisjoly Collection in the “Soundsing” section of the current Air & Space Magazine, a Smithsonian publication. The couple writes Lofty Ambitions, a blog about aerospace, aviation history and related issues. The article was timed to coincide with a finding aid describing the collection that is now available on the California Digital Library’s Online Archives.

Tibor Machan, Ph.D., professor and holder of the R.C. Hoiles Chair in Business Ethics and Free Enterprise at the Argyros School of Business and Economics, published  Influential Political Systems and Philosophers in History (San Diego, CA: Cognella Academic Publ., 2011).

Alicia Okouchi-Guy, assistant professor, Department of Dance, College of Performing Arts, was selected by the City of Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs to serve as a Peer Panelist for Small and Mid-Sized Dance Organizations. This elite panel of dance professionals meets in the Cultural Affairs building in Los Angeles to discuss and provide their individual recommendations for the allocation of grants. Professor Okouchi-Guy was charged with reviewing all eligible proposals, discussing project worthiness, making comments and assigning numerical scores.  The Grants Administration Division awards approximately $3 million annually to nurture and support community service providers and community artists in Los Angeles.

Brennan Peterson, Ph.D., associate professor, School of Health and Life Sciences, Schmid College of Science & Technology, co-presented two papers at the 2011 meeting of the Copenhagen Multi-Centre Psychosocial Infertility (COMPI) Research meeting.  The COMPI team is an interdisciplinary group of infertility scholars from the fields of medicine, public health, psychology, sociology, and anthropology.  Dr. Peterson represents the United States while other countries represented include Denmark, the United Kingdom, Portugal, and Israel. The group examines the psychosocial impact of infertility on men and women and seeks to understand how infertility treatments and their outcomes are related to personal and social stress in couples.  As a member of the team, Dr. Peterson presented papers on examining the role that secrecy regarding one’s infertility has on social support.  He also co-presented about a new typology to identify types of coping strategies for men and women experiencing infertility.  Dr. Peterson’s previous work with the COMPI group has examined the impact of couple coping patterns on an individual’s personal, social, and marital distress.  He has also examine how the stress of infertility can also lead to long-term benefits in couples including increased marital benefit – when the stress of the infertility experience paradoxically brings the couple closer.  His work has been published in Human Reproduction and Fertility and Sterility.  The 2011 COMPI meeting was the 5th meeting of the research group which began in 2006.

Walter Piper, Ph.D., professor, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Schmid College of Science and Technology, published a review article in the journal of Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology (Springer) titled Making habitat selection more “familiar”: a review. The article was the journal’s most downloaded citation in July.

Tatiana Prytkova, Ph.D., assistant professor, School of Computational Sciences, Schmid College of Science and Technology, published an article in the Journal of Physical Chemistry, a Tier 1 journal.  http://pubs.acs.org/doi/pdf/10.1021/jp203564q.

Timothy Shields, assistant professor, Argyros School of Business and Economics, published Generating Ambiguity in the Laboratory, MANAGEMENT SCIENCE, Vol. 57, No. 4, April 2011, pp. 705-712, DOI: 10.1287/mnsc.1100.1307; presented research at The Canadian Academic Accounting Association annual conference in Toronto, Canada in May; presented research at the 14th International Conference on Social Dilemmas held July 6 through Saturday July 9, in Amsterdam; was appointed to the Orange County Chapter Board of Directors of  the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF) and is training for the 72-mile JDRF Ride to Cure Diabetes.

Christopher Trela, adjunct professor, Dodge College of Film & Media Arts, won a 2011 Award of Excellence at the annual PROTOS Awards hosted by the OC Chapter of the Public Relations Society of America for Best Press Kit for a kit his public relations company ArtsPR created for The Laguna Playhouse’s production of “The Second City: Can You Be More Pacific.” Assisting with the project was ArtsPR account manager Laura Robinson, ’08.

Faculty and Staff News, June 23 

Grace Fong, D.M.A., Conservatory of Music, College of Performing Arts, recently returned as soloist with the Phoenix Symphony Orchestra, and Arizona Central music critic Richard Nilson said of her performance: “The program opened with the Grieg, and it was immediately a revelation. Not only did Fong play the music as lovingly as you might expect a Chopin nocturne … Fong gave us rhythmic variation as the core of her interpretation … beauty of her phrasing and the depth of her expression.”  This summer, Dr. Fong will also serve as a faculty member and performer at the Innsbrook Institute Summer Festival; and she will be the soloist for “Evening in Olde Vienna” with the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra.

Robert Frelly, D.M.A., associate professor of music, Conservatory of Music, College of Performing Arts, will be presented with a 2011 Annual Achievement Award by Arts Orange County at the 12th Annual Orange County Arts Awards in September at the Segerstrom Center for the Arts in Costa Mesa.

In addition, following a two-year national search, Dr. Frelly has been selected as the new Music Director and Conductor of the La Mirada Symphony.  This professional orchestra presents eight concerts per season with an average attendance of 2,000 people.   Dr. Frelly led the orchestra for five performances of the 2010-2011 season, and will now serve as the fourth music director in the organization’s 50-year history.

Phuong Le, Ed.D., adjunct faculty, College of Educational Studies, has been  awarded the inaugural Award for Outstanding International School Psychology Practice by the International School Psychology Association. (ISPA).   Dr. Le was chosen based on his work in bringing school psychology to Vietnam.  Chapman University is a founding member of the Consortium to Advance School Psychology in Vietnam, which Dr. Le was instrumental in creating.  Since 2009, several CES faculty members have traveled to Vietnam to teach and consult with Vietnamese universities regarding such topics as mental health services in the schools and violence prevention. Dr. Le will receive the award at the ISPA annual conference in Vellore, India this summer.

Donald Guy, assistant professor, Department of Theater, College of Performing Arts, has been commissioned to serve as lighting designer for a new production lighting designer for a new production titled “The Magic of Paris”, which will premiere at the Paris Hotel and Casino on the Las Vegas Strip this June. The production will feature magician Stephane Vanel (2001 World Champion and former star of the Crazy Horse Paris show at the MGM Grand) and will be directed by Joanie Spina (Choreographer and Artistic Consultant for David Copperfield and Casting Director for Franco Dragone’s “Kung Fu Panda” live show). The electrifying production is scheduled for an open-ended run and will showcase magic, illusions, dance, comedy and variety artists.

Tibor Machan, Ph.D., professor and holder of the R.C. Hoiles Chair in Business Ethics and Free Enterprise at the Argyros School of Business and Economics, announces that his book Liberty & Culture, Essays on the Idea of a Free Society was recently translated into Indonesian, with the title Kebebasan Dan Kebudayaan (Jakarta: Freedom Institute, 2006). In addition, his publication A Brief Summary of the History of Political Philosophy (San Diego, CA: Cognella Academic Publ., 2011) has just been published and his “Business & Liberty: An Ethical Union,” will be included in the Handbook of the Philosophical Foundations of BusinessEthics (Munich, Springer Verlag, 2012), which he helped edit. Other recent publications include the essays “Between Positive and Negative Rights,” in David Boersema, Philosophy of Human Rights (Westview Press, 2011), pp.81-85 and One Swallow: A Critique of Government Regulations,” Social Responsibility Journal (f/c); and the papers  “Truth in Philosophy,” in the newly-released Libertarian Papers, Vol. 3, No. 8 (2011). 1-9, “Drug Prohibition is both wrong and unworkable,” Think (No. 29), and “One Swallow: A Critique of Government Regulations.”

Mark Maier, Ph.D., associate professor, College of Educational Studies, coordinated the 6th Annual Orange County Leadership Conference hosted June 3 by the College of Educational Studies for 120 public sector senior managers from Orange County, representing more than 25 departments. The conference, Creating a Culture of Service, featured presentations by Lucy Dunn, president of the Orange County Business Council, William Campbell, chairman of the Orange County Board of Supervisors Chair, Col. Tom Magness, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (via Skype from Afghanistan), Colleene Preciado, former chief of probation, and a panel discussion featuring four top county administrators:  Dr. Michael Riley, Social Services, Alan Murphy, John Wayne Airport, Deborah Kwast, Public Defender, and Steven Sentman Chief of Probation. The panel was moderated by Darren Smith, I.T. Manager, O.C. Waste and Recycling.

Marvin Meyer, Ph.D., Griset Professor of Religious Studies, Wilkinson College, delivered an invited paper on “Albert Schweitzer, Reverence for Life, and World Religions” at an international conference on “Morality, Spirituality, and Culture” meeting at Yibin University in China on May 29, 2011. On the same trip he also met in Bangkok with the screen-writer of an award-winning film on Schweitzer produced in South Africa, and they discussed possible plans for future collaboration.

Alexandro Segade, adjunct faculty, Department of Art, Wilkinson College, with artist Eve Fowler, is co-curator of the California Institute of the Arts MFA Grad Exhibition. The opening reception will be held at 6 p.m. June 25. The exhibit runs through July 10. For details visit the CalArts website.

Faculty & Staff News, June 1

Thomas Bradac, associate professor, Department of Theatre, College of Performing Arts, was invited to be a guest speaker at Whittier College for an interdisciplinary seminar titled Los Angeles Integrated Arts on the topic of “Producing Non-Profit Theatre Including My Life in Art — Specifically Shakespeare”.  Other speakers included representatives from the Getty Center, Los Angeles Opera and the Grammy Museum.

The Italian 343 class taught by Robert Buranello, Ph.D., associate professor, Department of Languages, Wilkinson College, participated in the first annual Orange County Italian Cultural Association poetry contest on May 1, 2011, and also covered the event for L’Italo-Americano, the weekly bilingual (Italian-English) newspaper founded in 1908 in Los Angeles County. The students’ article may be read at the newspaper’s website.

Karen Gallagher, Ph.D., visiting assistant professor of German, Department of Languages, Wilkinson College, has received a grant of $6,800 from the German Embassy to promote German language and culture in fall 2011, based on her successful partnership with the Germany Embassy and the German Consulate General Los Angeles in 2009 and 2010. She previously received grants for the nationwide “Freedom Without Walls” events and, most recently, for “Berlin 1948: The Candy Bomber, the Baseball Sergeant, and the Airlift that Saved a City.” The current grant will be administered by James Coyle, Ph.D., director for Global Education, Chapman University.

Donald Guy, assistant professor, Department of Theater, College of Performing Arts, was commissioned to serve as lighting designer and production coordinator for the Gala of the Stars Invitational Dance Festival, held at the Irvine Barclay Theatre on May 6th. The evening of dance featured performances by Danil Simkin (American Ballet Theatre), Lorena Feijoo (San Francisco Ballet), Vitor Luiz (San Francisco Ballet), Youth America Grand Prix award winners, and Festival Ballet Theatre.

Tibor Machan, Ph.D., professor and holder of the R.C. Hoiles Chair in Business Ethics and Free Enterprise at the Argyros School of Business and Economics, gave his paper, “One Swallow,” at a conference on Corporate Social Responsibility at Loyola University, New Orleans, on May 18, 2011.  (It concerned the argument that government regulation, which Machan considers a form of prior restraint, has some benefits despite its great cost when it prevents some bad results from coming about [e.g., thalidomide damages] or produces some benefits [e.g., refrigerator safety in California].  Recalling a famous observation of the ancient Greek philosopher Aristotle that one swallow does not make a spring time, one benefit from a wrongful practice doesn’t make the practice good.  As the saying goes, even a broken clock tells the correct time twice a day. Using coercion against manufacturers, et al., can produce some benefit but is still unjustified when used against those not found guilty of any malpractice.)

Andrew Moshier, Ph.D., professor, School of Computational Sciences, Schmid College of Science, has been named a Plumer Visiting Fellow at St Anne’s College, University of Oxford. Dr. Moshier will be at Oxford for two months this summer and return for part of January, 2011.

Faculty & Staff News, May 13

Patrick Goeser, adjunct faculty, Conservatory of Music, College of Performing Arts, has been chosen to receive the 2011 U.S. Presidential Scholars Program’s Teacher Recognition Award.

Every year, student scholars in this prestigious program select their most “inspiring and unforgettable teacher.” Goeser was nominated by one of his high school students who was named a Presidential Scholar and will travel to Washington D.C. in June to meet President Obama in a White House award ceremony. The U.S. Presidential Scholars Program was created in 1964 to honor academic achievement.

Donald Guy, assistant professor of theatre, Department of Theatre, College of Performing Arts, was recently commissioned to serve as the Technical Director and Lighting Designer for the Maple Youth Ballet production of Alice in Wonderland. The production, choreographed by former American Ballet Theatre soloist Charles Maple, debuted at the Irvine Barclay Theatre.

Claudine Jaenichen, assistant professor, Department of Art, Wilkinson College, was invited to chair the 2011 International Institute for Information Design (IID) Healthcare Awards.The International Institute for Information Design (IIID) was founded to develop research and practice in optimizing information and information systems for knowledge transfer in everyday life, business, education and science.

Kate Karniouchina, Ph.D. and Can Uslay, Ph.D., assistant professors, Argyros School of Business and Economics (with Grigori Erenburg of King’s University College, University of Western Ontario) published their interdisciplinary article “Do Marketing Media Have Life Cycles? The Case of Product Placement in Movies” in the May 2011 issue of the Journal of Marketing. Their findings include evidence of an inverted U-shaped relationship between the year of the movie release and the stock returns associated with product placements and tie-in campaigns. Counter intuitively, lower intensity, fleeting placements can be more profitable than repetitive and more expensive marquee placements with main characters. The Journal of Marketing is the top journal in the field of marketing with an impact factor in the top five of all business journals.

Jason Keller, assistant professor, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Schmid College of Science, is a co-author on a paper entitled, “Electron donors and acceptors influence rates of decomposition in tidal marshes” which appears in the journal Soil Biology & Biochemistry.  This research was completed with colleagues from the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center and investigates the controls of microbial processes and greenhouse gas dynamics in tidal wetland ecosystems.  The article can be found at:  http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.soilbio.2011.04.008.

Marvin Meyer, Ph.D., chair of the Department of Religious Studies, Wilkinson College, delivered a paper on “The Young Streaker in Secret and Canonical Mark” (see Mark 14:51-52) at an international conference on the Secret Gospel of Mark held at York University in Toronto on the weekend of April 28-30. “The question of the Secret or Mystical Gospel of Mark is one of the hottest issues in the study of Markan traditions,” Meyer noted. “Ever since the gospel fragments were discovered in 1958 at the Mar Saba Monastery and published in 1973 by Professor Morton Smith of Columbia University, they have been the subject of a great deal of debate. Are the fragments authentic? Or have they been forged? And if they are authentic, how should they be interpreted?” The conference brought together the leading scholars on Secret Mark for a discussion and debate on the text containing the selections of Secret Mark. “The discussion was spirited but civil,” Meyer reported,” and a quick check at the conclusion of the conference seemed to confirm that among the scholars present nobody’s mind had been changed.”

Todd Plesco, director of information security, recently participated in a speaking panel at the 2011 Security Professionals Conference in San Antonio, Texas.  The panel was comprised of leaders of information security from Rochester Institute of Technology, University of Rochester, and Case Western Reserve University.  Lessons learned during their private information remediation efforts were shared, both in the use of technology solutions and in the identification and destruction of hard-copy assets. Plesco also recently coordinated, with Chapman University’s sponsorship, along with CyberWatch and the National Cyber Security Alliance (NCSA), a contest seeking posters and short information security awareness videos developed by college students, for college students. The posters and videos will be featured on the EDUCAUSE website, as well as the contest’s YouTube channel and Facebook page, and may be used in campus security awareness campaigns. Winners are currently in the process of being notified.

Charu Sinha, Ph.D., assistant professor, Argyros School of Business and Economics, is the lead author of the paper “Computationally Simple and Unified Approach to Finite and Infinite Horizon Clark-Scarf Inventory Model” recently published in IIE Transactions, the peer-reviewed and highly-regarded flagship journal of the Institute of Industrial Engineers.  Her co-authors on this paper are Professor Matthew J. Sobel of Case Western Reserve University and Professor Volodymyr Babich of Georgetown University.  The paper presents an efficient methodology to compute work-order release rules in a serial manufacturing system while bypassing a dynamic programming computation.  The dynamic programming approach for analyzing multi-echelon inventory systems has been prevalent in the literature ever since Clark and Scarf first outlined it in their seminal paper, listed among the 10 most influential papers ever published in the prestigious Management Science journal.  Dr. Sinha’s article can be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0740817X.2010.523766.

Louise Thomas, associate professor, Conservatory of Music, College of Performing Arts, performed a Grand Salon Series recital with the principal oboist of the Los Angeles Philharmonic, Ariana Ghez,  at the invitation of the Peninsula Committee in Palos Verdes. The mission of the Peninsula Committee is to support the Los Angeles Philharmonic through fund raising and audience development, to promote youth music education, and to foster appreciation of music in the community.

Tamiko Washington, associate professor, Department of Theatre, College of Performing Arts, has founded a new independent theatre company, Actors Circle Ensemble (ACE).  Company members include BFA theatre performance students Casey Jay Adler ’11, Sean Burgos ’11 and Andre Stojka ’11.  ACE’s debut production will include two critically acclaimed one-acts: The Indian Wants the Bronx by Israel Horovitz and Tom & Jerry by Jim Geoghan.  The performances will take place at the Ivy Substation in Culver City, May 25-28.

Faculty and Staff News, April 18, 2011

Fred Caporaso, Ph.D., professor, Crean School of Health and Life Sciences, Schmid College of Science, presented an invited paper at the 31st Annual International Symposium on Sea Turtle Biology and Conservation in the Terrestrial and Freshwater Turtle Symposium Session (4-11-11) in San Diego.  The presentation was titled “The Pinzón Island Tortoise (Geochelone ephippium): From Certain Extinction to Recovery and Beyond!”and detailed the challenging natural history of a species of giant tortoise from a remote island in the Galápagos Islands. Due to the introduction of black rats (Rattus rattus) onto Pinzón in the late 1890s, (rats attack and consume hatchling tortoises), this species had no surviving young for over 70 years. For most animals on earth, this would assure extinction, but Galápagos tortoises are unique and can effectively reproduce through old age. Dr. Caporaso detailed the extraordinary conservation program conducted jointly by the Charles Darwin Research Station and the Galápagos National Park Service to bring the Pinzón Island Tortoise back from the brink of extinction.

Hesham El-Askary, Ph.D., associate professor, Earth System Science and Remote Sensing and Director Hazards, Schmid College of Science, has led a book chapter co-authored with Menas Kafatos, Anup Prasad and others titled “Analyzing Black Cloud Dynamics over Cairo, Nile Delta Region and Alexandria using Aerosols and Water Vapor Data.” In the book, titled Air Quality with INTEC Publishing, Dr. El-Askary and his collaborators proposed a wider contribution from other anthropogenic sources in surrounding cities among the major contributors to chronic pollution problems over Cairo. The authors discovered that there exists a complicated pattern of aerosol production and transport over the Nile Delta and Cairo, where the air masses exhibit mesoscale circulations and each city’s air quality is affected from other cities, mainly from the North, which is clearly shown over Cairo.

Grace Fong, D.M.A., assistant professor and director of keyboard studies, Conservatory of Music, has recently returned from her third time performing at the Kennedy Center in Washington D.C., this time sharing the stage with the National Symphony Orchestra. In addition, the music video filmed by Oscar-nominated director Mike Figgis and featuring Dr. Fong, was premiered at the 2011 Barbados Music Festival.

Lori Cox Han, Ph.D., professor, Department of Political Science, Wilkinson College, just had her tenth book published: A Presidency Upstaged: The Public Leadership of George H.W. Bush, with Texas A&M University Press. The book, which analyzes the public aspects of the Bush presidency, incorporates extensive archival research at the Bush Presidential Library, including documents only recently made available through a Freedom of Information Act request, some of which Dr. Han was the first to access.  Research for the book was funded in part through two separate O’Donnell Research Grants from the Bush Foundation.

Wenshan Jia, Ph.D., professor, Department of Communications, Wilkinson College, was recently promoted to full professor and has also been selected as a participant in the Asian Studies Development Program (ASDP) Institute on Infusing China and Korea into Undergraduate Curriculum, East-West Center, Honolulu, Hawaii. ASDP and the Summer Institute are funded by Freeman Foundation. It runs July 25-August 12, 2011.

Baron Kelly, Ph.D., assistant professor of theatre, joined actor Richard Chamberlin and other celebrities to celebrate the screening of a film featuring Dr. Kelly titled Thoughts of Suicide at the Lake Arrowhead Film Festival April 14-17.

Economic Science Institute professors Vernon Smith, Ph.D., Bart Wilson, Ph.D., David Porter, Ph.D., and Jeffrey Kirchner, ESI’s senior software engineer, gave a two-hour interactive presentation at this year’s Reason Foundation, Reason Weekend.  Dr. Wilson gave the first talk on the “Discovering Exchange, Specialization, and Property” and used the ESI Mobile Lab to conduct a 30 min demonstration experiment.  In the second hour Dr. Porter explained the Chapman Parking Auction and also conducted a demonstration experiment with the audience.

Lisa Sparks, Ph.D., the Foster and Mary McGaw Endowed Professor in Behavioral Sciences and director of Graduate Studies for the Master of Science in Health Communication, was the invited keynote speaker at the Bay Area Undergrad Communication Research Conference held April 16 on the campus of San Jose State University. Conference participants included University of San Francisco, University of Southern California, Santa Clara University, University of the Pacific and California State University campuses San Jose, San Francisco, Humboldt, Fresno and Long Beach. Dr. Spark’s address focused on her research in cancer communication science.

Anna V. Wilson, Ph.D., associate professor, College of Educational Studies, was the invited speaker for the Graduate Student Symposium at the annual conference of the American Association of Advanced Curricular Studies in New Orleans, LA, April 6, 2010.  She was chairperson of the panel “Listening to Queer Voices” and presented a paper entitled “Rhizomatic Archaeology of Lesbian Identity” at the annual conference of the American Educational Research Association.  Anna was elected Chairperson of the Queer Studies SIG of the American Educational Research Association for the AY 2011-2012.

Faculty and Staff News, April 1, 2011

Eyal Amitai, Ph.D., associate professor in the School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Schmid College of Science, has been named collaborator on a NASA award (NNX11AE31G) to NOAA National Severe Strom Laboratory (NSSL) through the University of Oklahoma. NOAA is proposing to conduct comprehensive evaluation of NASA’s satellite precipitation products using their Next Generation high-resolution radar rain rate products. Amitai is requested to help guiding this effort, and to apply his new algorithm that adjusts the NOAA products to the rain gauges, and provides the most accurate rainfall rate maps over the entire continental U.S. In addition to the new award, Chapman University (with Eyal as a Principal Investigator) is currently a lead institution on two research grants awarded by NASA in which NASA and NOAA scientists are collaborating.

Donald Guy, assistant professor, Department of Theatre, College of Performing Arts, has been commissioned to serve as lighting designer and technical director for the Festival Ballet Theatre’s production of the full-length ballet Coppélia on March 26-27 at the Irvine Barclay Theatre. The production will feature Megan Fairchild and Andrew Veyette of New York City Ballet.

Sean Heim, associate professor of music, and Nick Terry, assistant professor of music, recently returned from a performance tour of Taiwan and Hong Kong.  Invited to participate in a series of concerts titled A Confluence of Cultures, Heim and Terry joined composers and performers gathered from across the Pacific Rim in presenting concerts at the National Concert Hall (Taipei) and Red Square Gallery (Hong Kong).  Both sold-out performances featured music that explores the evocative, novel, and inspirational combination of Western & Eastern musical traditions.

“Aftertouch” composed for piano by Vera Ivanova, assistant professor, Conservatory of Music, College of Performing Arts, was featured this year at the “L’Amérique, Aujourd’hui” concert at the USA Foundation (Paris, France, 03/10/2011) and will be included in the 32nd International Contemporary Music Festival “Moscow Autumn” (Moscow, Russia, 11/22/2011). It will also be performed at Mark Robson’s recital on Piano Spheres series (Los Angeles, USA, 04/12/2011). The piece is scheduled to be released on CD by Capstone Records on the next SCI CD series this spring, thanks to the support received from the Subito Grant program (American Composers Forum, San Francisco Bay Area Chapter). This year Professor Ivanova also received a Special Award from the Yvar Mikhashoff, Pianist/Composer Commissioning Project, and will be featured as one of emerging composers in residence at the Staunton Music Festival (August 19-27 at Staunton, Va).

Liliana Leopardi, Ph.D., assistant professor, Department of Art, Wilkinson College of Humanities and Social Sciences, will be an invited lecturer at the Timken Museum of Art in San Diego’s Balboa Park April 11, speaking on “Portraits and Gender: The Case of Bartolomeo Veneto and Boltraffio in the Collections of the Timken Museum of Art. The lecture is open only to museum members.

Francine J. Lipman, professor, School of Law, has been appointed by the American Bar Association to be the chair of its Committee on Pro Bono within the Section of Taxation for a two-year term starting July 1. Professsor Lipman’s selection as committee chair represents recognition by her peers of her abilities and contributions to the work of the Section of Taxation.

Matthew W. McCarter, Ph.D., assistant professor, Argyros School of Business and Economics, has had a paper accepted by the prestigious Academy of Management Review. “Testing the Waters: How Collective Real Options Manage the Social Dilemma of Strategic Alliances” examines the development of trust when firms form alliances or pool resources on joint projects. The paper was co-authored by Joseph T. Mahoney and Gregory B. Northcraft, both of  University of Illinois at Urbana. The Academy of Management Review is listed by ISI Web of Science as the #1 scholarly outlet for management and business and has an acceptance rate of under 10%.

Atanas RadenskiI, Ph.D., professor, School of Computational Sciences, Schmid College of Science,
has accepted an invitation serve on the Editorial Board of the Serdica Journal of Computing. This international journal is published quarterly (in English) by the Institute of Mathematics and Informatics of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences.

Doug Sweet, director of Undergraduate Writing, delivered a presentation, “Released from the Ghosts of Platonic Idealism,” at the New York Conference on Writing held in Binghamton, N.Y., March 17-20. Sweet was also a featured scholar for a special edition of College English, Vol. 73. No. 4. March, 2011. Professor Sweet contributed to a “Forum on Identity” for this issue.

Nick Terry, assistant professor of music, recently adjudicated and performed with his ensemble the Los Angeles Percussion Quartet at the Central California Day of Percussion, hosted by California State University Fresno, and presented by the Percussive Arts Society.  Throughout the day, Terry and his ensemble gave multiple performances (including Occasus by assistant professor of music Jeffrey Holmes) and group master classes for approximately 300 percussion enthusiasts.  Celebrating its 20th year, the Central California Day of Percussion is one of the oldest and largest percussion festivals in the western United States.

Faculty and Staff News, March 14

Grace Fong, D.M.A., assistant professor and director of keyboard studies, College of Performing Arts, will be performing as soloist with the Phoenix Symphony and giving a performance tour in Japan in the next few weeks. Of her recent performance March 6th at the American Pianists Association’s Grand Encounters Series in Indianapolis, Indiana, music critic Tom Aldridge raved: ”Of her appearances here since her Fellowship award — one a solo recital at Butler, another a concerto performance with the Indianapolis Chamber Orchestra — she has continued to mesmerize us with her uncanny control of all facets of keyboard technique and musicianship.”

Hesham El-Askary, Ph.D., assistant professor of Earth System Science and Remote Sensing and Director Hazards, Global and Environmental Change Program has recently coauthored a paper titled “Three-year ground based measurements of aerosol optical depth over the Eastern Mediterranean: the urban environment of Athens” that has been accepted for publication in the tier 1, prestigious Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions (ACPD). A link to the paper can be found at http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/11/2145/2011/acp-11-2145-2011.html

In this study three years (2006–2008) of ground-based and satellite observations of the Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) in the urban environment of Athens, in the Eastern Mediterranean, are analyzed. The two datasets show a good agreement on an annual basis, but with an overestimation of satellite AODs in the warm period.

Baron Kelly, Ph.D., assistant professor, Department of Theatre, College of Performing Arts, has been named to the Fulbright Specialist Program and won the prestigious J. William Fulbright Specialist Grant at the University of Lodz, Poland, British and Commonwealth Studies Department.  He has been invited to present lectures and lead graduate seminars focusing on the issues of multiculturalism and diversity in the European Union.  In addition, he will also be involved with curriculum development.  Dr. Kelly will be in Poland at some point during the 2011-2012 year.  He is one of more than 400 faculty and professionals who will travel abroad this year through the Fulbright Specialist Program.

This is the second Fulbright Award that Dr. Kelly has won in the last three years.  In 2008, he had the opportunity to research in Norway at the International Migration and Ethnic Relations Institute at the University of Bergen.

Anna Leahy, Ph.D., associate professor, Department of English, Wilkinson College, published a collaborative conversation essay with Cathy Day and Stephanie Vanderslice at Fiction Writers Review. The essay appears in two parts and may be read at:

http://fictionwritersreview.com/essays/where-are-we-going-next-a-conversation-about-creative-writing-pedagogy-pt-1

http://fictionwritersreview.com/essays/where-are-we-going-next-a-conversation-about-creative-writing-pedagogy-pt-2

Another piece by the authors appears in Issue #1 of Toad Suck Review, which was formerly Exquisite Corpse.

Louise Thomas, D.M.A, associate professor, Ph.D., associate professor, Conservatory of Music, College of Performing Arts, recently returned from a performance in New York City’s prestigious Merkin Hall at the Kauffman Center. Dr. Thomas performed with violinist, Elizabeth Pitcairn in a program which featured her world-famous instrument, the “Red Violin”. The concert marked the launch of Ms. Pitcairn’s, “Little Red Violin Foundation” which will raise money for scholarships and instruments for young string players.

Faculty & Staff News, March 2

Cristina Bruns, Ph.D., adjunct instructor, Department of English, Wilkinson College, presented a paper in a session she organized and chaired at the Modern Language Association’s convention in Los Angeles in January. The session was entitled “Why Literature Matters,” and its three papers were “Literature as Alternative Reality,” by Gregory Jusdanis, Professor and Director of the Modern Greek Program at The Ohio State University, “Literature as Formative Experience,” by Dr. Bruns, and “Literature as Other to Our Age,” by Mark W. Roche, Rev. Edmund P. Joyce Professor of German Language and Literature at University of Notre Dame. Dr. Brun’s paper and the focus of the session were drawn from her book, Why Literature? The Value of Literary Reading and What It Means for Teaching, due out this May with Continuum.

Donald Guy, assistant professor, Department of Theatre, College of Performing Arts, has been commissioned to serve as lighting designer and production consultant for the 2nd International Magic Festival in Athens, Greece. The production, playing at the 2,500 seat Badminton Theatre, will feature master magicians Kalin and Jinger, illusionist Raymond Crowe, magician George Saterial and comedian/juggler Michael Goudeau.

Lia Halloran, assistant professor, Department of Art, Wilkinson College, had artwork included in the exhibition “Universe City” at Cal State Los Angeles, Jan. 29-Feb. 26. Halloran was also one of the presenters for X-TRA/ LACMA, 1IMAGE/ 1MINUTE event on Friday January 28th for the Los Angeles Art Fair based on X-TRA column by Micol Hebron.

Kerk F. Kee, Ph.D., assistant professor, Department of Communication Studies, Wilkinson College, published: The dialectical tensions in the funding infrastructure of cyberinfrastructure. Computer Supported Cooperative Work, 19(3), 283-308; and Cyberinfrastructure inside out: Definitions and influences shaping its emergence, development, and implementation In D. Araya, Y. Breindl & T. Houghton (Eds.), Nexus: New intersections in Internet research (pp. 157-189). New York: Peter Lang.

Christopher Kim, associate professor, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Schmid College of Science, published an article in Applied Geochemistry entitled “Particle-Size Dependence on Metal(loid) Distributions in Mine Wastes: Implications for Water Contamination and Human Exposure.”  The article, with co-authors Kim Wilson (2008 Chapman grad) and Jim Rytuba (USGS) identified inverse trends between particle size and trace metal (loid) concentrations in mine wastes and concluded that regulatory agencies may severely underestimate metal (loid) levels in fine-grained size fractions. The article can be found at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apgeochem.2011.01.007

Tibor R. Machan, Ph.D., professor and holder of the R. C. Hoiles Chair in Business Ethics and Free Enterprise at the Argyros School, was a panelist Feb. 10 at the World Affairs Council’s meeting “U.S. Immigration Policy in the 21st Century: The Landscape Today and Beyond.”

Dr. Machan’s recently publications include his new book, The Normative Case for the Free Market System: Did Capitalism Cause the Financial Fiasco? (Addleton Academic Press) and several papers, including: “Backing the Founders: The Case for Unalienable Individual Rights,” Libertarian Papers 2, 42 (2010), online at libertarianpapers.org; “Reexamining Democracy,” Contemporary Readings in Law and Social Justice 3(1), 2011; and “Drug Prohibition is both wrong and unworkable,” Think (No. 29)

Dr. Machan is also scheduled to be a guest for three hours on C-Span’s Book World (In Depth) call-in program May 1, 2011.

Alicia Okouchi-Guy, assistant professor of dance, College of Performing Arts, was selected by a panel of dance adjudicators to have her choreography presented in the Pasadena Dance Festival Concert at the Pasadena Civic Auditorium. Her piece, “Interference,” was chosen to close the professional concert that included the world-renowned Mark Morris Dance Group from New York and seven other professional dance companies from Southern California. The festival was a three-day event that included master classes, an Emerging Choreographers Showcase, a Student Concert and a Professional Concert. The Pasadena Dance Festival was sponsored in part by the Pasadena Arts & Culture Commission and the City of Pasadena Cultural Affairs Division.

Alexandro Segade, assistant professor, Department of Art, Wilkinson College, and his performance art group, My Barbarian, led a workshop and perform Post-Living Ante-Action Theater, an original performance form developed by the company, which evolves from their own interdisciplinary practice as well as two avant-garde collectives of the 1960′s — New York’s Living Theatre and Munich’s Action-Theater at The 32nd Rhubarb Festival, a major performance art festival in Toronto Feb. 16-20. This interdisciplinary performance was co-presented with The Power Plant Contemporary Art Gallery, in partnership with b current, Cahoots Theatre Company, fu-GEN Theatre, Native Earth Performing Arts and The Graduate Centre for Study of Drama at University of Toronto.

Bart Wilson, Ph.D., professor, Economic Science Institute, and the Donald P. Kennedy Endowed Chair in Economics and Law, recently published “Responses to the Assurance game in monkeys, apes, and humans using equivalent procedures” in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America with Drs. Sarah F. Brosnan, Audrey Parrish, Michael J. Beran, Timothy Flemming, Lisa Heimbauer, Catherine F. Talbot, Susan P. Lambeth, and Steven J. Schapiro. The study investigated how three primate species, capuchin monkeys, chimpanzees, and humans, played the Assurance (or Stag Hunt) game using procedures that were, to the best of their ability, the same across species, particularly with respect to training and pretesting. Their goal was to determine what, if any, differences existed in the ways in which these species made decisions in this game. Another article, “Humans not that much better than fellow primates at game theory” by John Timmer was published online based on the research: http://arstechnica.com/science/news/2011/02/humans-not-that-much-better-than-fellow-primates-at-game-theory.ars.

 

Faculty and Staff news, Feb. 4, 2011

Eyal Amitai, Ph.D., associate professor, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, has been selected to become an Associate Editor for the Journal of Hydrometeorology, the premier journal in the field. Published bimonthly by the American Meteorological Society, the Journal of Hydrometeorology covers research related to the modeling, observing, and forecasting of processes related to water and energy fluxes and storage terms, including interactions with the boundary layer and lower atmosphere, and including processes related to precipitation, radiation, and other meteorological inputs.

Wenshan Jia, Ph. D., associate professor, Department of Communication Studies, Wilkinson College, has recently published an article titled “Chimerica: US-China Communication for the 21st Century” (pp. 161-170) as the first author with Dexin Tian and Xuanzi Jia in L. A. Samovar, R. E. Porter, & E. R McDaniel (Eds.) Intercultural Communication: A Reader (13th Edition), a best-seller of three decades duration published by Cengage/Wadworth.

Bohemia in America 1858-1920, by Joanna Levin, Ph.D., associate professor, Department of English, Wilkinson College, has been selected as one of CHOICE Magazine’s 2010 Outstanding Academic Titles.

Tibor R. Machan, Ph.D., professor and holder of the R. C. Hoiles Chair in Business Ethics and Free Enterprise at the Argyros School, was a guest speaker Jan. 27 at The Ohio State University Moritz College of Law where he presented a talk on “Canine the Barbarian: The Problem with Animal Rights.” A tape of the presentation may be viewed on YouTube.

Alicia Okouchi-Guy, assistant professor of dance, College of Performing Arts, was selected to present her choreography in Ballet Etudes: 3rd Annual Invitational Winter Dance Concert and Choreographers’ Showcase at the Irvine Valley College Performing Arts Center in Irvine. Her piece, “Interference”, a men’s quartet, was performed by dance majors Christopher Carvalho, Joe Chantry, Derek Nemechek, Daniel Ortiz and Chris Babcock (understudy). The Invitational included iconic dance choreography from Les Sylphides by Michel Fokine and Dances for Isadora by José Limón. Alicia was also invited to serve as an adjudicator for the 2011 High School Dance Invitational in Irvine. She served as a respondent for 25 new works choreographed by faculty, students and guest artists from Southern California high school dance programs.

Ramesh P. Singh, Ph.D., professor, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, organized an International Training Workshop on Remote Sensing of Atmospheric Aerosols and Their Impacts conducted January 2 – 16 at Sharda University, Greater Noida. The training workshop was sponsored by COSPAR, and co-sponsored by various Indian funding agencies, European Space Agencies and also Chapman University. In this two weeks workshop, 23 International Speakers from NASA, ESA, Germany, Italy, China, Finland, Canada and India gave lectures on basic of remote sensing, data analysis, various applications to monitor atmospheric pollution, air quality, vegetation, ocean, lake and water bodies and study local, regional and global climatic changes. Northern India is severely affected by the dense haze and fog during December and January and as a result trains and flights run late affecting millions of people living in the region.

Infringement Nation: Copyright 2.0 and You, a new book by John Tehranian, professor, School of Law, scheduled for March release by Oxford University Press is receiving advance praise from multiple reviewers. Among the reviewers was Mark A. Lemley, William H. Neukom Professor of Law, Stanford University, who writes: “Could you be committing $4.5 billion in copyright infringements every year? John Tehranian’s witty, engaging book suggests that the answer might be yes, and explains why the fault lies not with you, but with the copyright laws.”

Angela Tumini, Ph.D., assistant professor, Department of Languages, Wilkinson College, recently published a book titled An Unintentional Liaison: Lars von Trier and Italian Cinema and Culture (VDM Verlag Dr. Muller 2011). Dr. Tumini’s book focuses on the way in which von Trier’s cinema can simultaneously be redefined in relationship with Italian cinema and culture, while rethinking, at the same time, the spectator’s relationship to the movies.

Faculty & Staff News, Jan. 18, 2011

Lori Cox Han, Ph.D., professor, Department of Political Science, Wilkinson College, recently published an edited volume titled New Directions in the American Presidency (Routledge, 2011), which takes a current look at the various issues facing the presidency and provides a “state of the art” overview of current trends in the field of presidency research.  David Shafie, Ph.D., assistant professor, Department of Political Science, contributed one of the original essays to the volume titled “The Presidency and Domestic Policy.”

Susan Deane, technical assistant, facilities management, was featured in a Jan. 12 podcast interview with Maintenance Solutions, an online magazine produced by FacilitiesNet.com. The podcast is titled CMMS: The Importance of Data with Susan Deane and may be heard at the magazine’s website.

Grace Fong, Ph.D., director of keyboard studies, performed on tour with Sony-Classical Artist, Gilles Apap of France, hailed by the late Yehudi Menuhin as “a true violinist of the 21st century.”  Dr. Fong was also a guest artist on Pink Martini’s “Joy to the World” CD internationally released in November, which was the “pick of the week” of the New York Times, Starbucks, iTunes, and Amazon. Dr. Fong was also invited to adjudicate the Impressionist/Contemporary Music Festival Competition and the California Association of Professional Music Teachers Chamber Music Competition.

Alicia Okouchi-Guy, assistant professor of dance, was recently commissioned by the Boston Celtics to serve as guest choreographer in Boston for the team’s professional NBA dance team, the Celtics Dancers.

 

Mary Platt, director of communications, has been selected to be a judge for the 2011 Awards of Excellence at the annual Council for the Advancement and Support of Education (CASE) District Conference, to be held in Los Angeles on March 2-5. CASE is an international professional association serving educational institutions and the advancement professionals who work on their behalf in alumni relations, communications, development, marketing and allied areas.

 

Bart Wilson, Ph.D., professor, Economic Science Institute, and Jeff Kirchner, senior software engineer at the Economic Science Institute, just conducted a three- day workshop in Experimental Economics at Vilnius University in Lithuania.  The workshop was organized by Rimvydas Baltaduonis, who was born in Lithuania and was a former post doctoral student at the institute.  He has since been hired by Gettysburg College in the economics department.Faculty & Staff News, Dec. 21

 Faculty & Staff News, Dec. 4, 2010

Carol Bonner, director, University Advancement operations, has been named Assistant Vice President of University Advancement, operations and information systems, effective Jan. 1.

Virginia Halverson, assistant to the dean, Wilkinson College of Humanities and Social Sciences, has been promoted to Creative Projects and Events Manager for the dean’s office of Wilkinson.

Matt Miller, web managing editor, Publications and Creative Services, will join the Alumni Relations Department as the new Alumni Outreach and Networks Manager effective January 3.  In his new role, Miller will implement a strategic alumni outreach, network and connections plan.

Taryn Stroop, administrative assistant, department of sociology, Wilkinson College of Humanities and Social Sciences, has been promoted to Administrative Assistant to the Dean and Associate Dean, Wilkinson.

Faculty News & Notes, Dec. 15

Baron Kelly, Ph.D., assistant professor, Department of Theatre, College of Performing Arts, has just returned from a performance/lecture tour of the cities of Taichung, Taipe, Tainan, and Chiayi in Taiwan, and Beijing. In 2012, he will return to Beijing to direct Eugene O’Neill’s Ah, Wilderness! or Mourning Becomes Electra. Dr. Baron was also a keynote speaker at the EALA (English and American Literature Association) conference at National Chung Hsing University in Taichung.

Annie Knight, coordinator of Brandman library services and librarian liaison for Film/Media Arts, LGBT Studies, and Sociology, and Stacy Russo, chair of public services and librarian liaison for Education and Women’s Studies, both of Leatherby Libraries, recently presented poster sessions at the National Women’s Studies Association 31st Annual Conference. The conference was held in Denver November 11-14. Knight’s presentation “Zines and Women’s Studies 101: Fostering a Creative Approach to Research Assignments through Zine Workshops at the Library” illustrated the components of a library instruction session that teaches zine making and the Do-It-Yourself aesthetic and history of zine publishing while also incorporating hands-on activities to foster student analysis of zine literature. Russo’s presentation was titled “June! Discovering the Tools of an Activist Teacher” and examined the classroom of the late June Jordan through assignments, syllabi, and course descriptions Russo researched with the June Jordan Papers at Radcliffe Institute’s Schlesinger Library. Anyone interested in these presentations may contact Knight (aknight@chapman.edu) and Russo (russo@chapman.edu) for copies of their posters and accompanying materials.

Nancy M. Martin, Ph.D., associate professor, Department of Religious Studies, Wilkinson College, presented a paper titled “Identities, Communities and Religious Figures in Transition: The Transformation a Sixteenth-Century Hindu Saint into a Global Icon“ at the International Conference on the Image held at UCLA on December 2. In November she delivered two lectures at California Lutheran University, the first for students in the religion department on the immensely popular Hindu woman Saint Mirabai, and the second a university-wide lecture titled “Holiness and the Pursuit of Justice: Perspectives from the World Religions.” Professor Martin’s most recent article on this now global figure “Mirabai Comes to America: The Translation and Transformation of a Saint,” published earlier this year in the Journal of Hindu Studies, can be accessed on-line.

Liz Maxwell, assistant professor, Department of Dance, College of Performing Arts, has published an article in the peer-reviewed International Journal of the Humanities Volume 8, Issue 8. Her article titled “Decisions in Art Making: An Illustration Through Dance” is the culmination of her research presented at the Eighth International Conference on New Directions in the Humanities at UCLA this past summer.

Donald Guy, assistant professor, Department of Theatre, College of Performing Arts, is preparing for a busy December. He will serve as Production Supervisor for Festival Ballet Theatre’s production of The Nutcracker at the Irvine Barclay Theatre at UC Irvine. The production will feature American Ballet Theatre stars Gillian Murphy, Gennadi Saveliev, Irina Dvorovenko and Jose Manuel Carreño. He has also been commissioned by renowned choreographer David Allan to design a premiere production of The Nutcracker featuring New York City Ballet Principal Dancer Sterling Hyltin.

Wenshan Jia, Ph.D., assistant professor, Department of Communications, Wilkinson College, and Gregg A. Payne, Ph.D., assistant professor, Department of Communications, Wilkinson College, announce that the fall 2010 edition of Global Media Journal (American Edition) has been published, and can be accessed online. Dr. Payne is guest editor. Dr. Jia is the graduate student submissions editor.

A paper titled “Saving Behavior and Cognitive Abilities” co-authored by Nathaniel T. Wilcox, Ph.D., Economic Science Institute, has been accepted for publication in the journal of Experimental Economics. Experiments on saving behavior reveal substantial heterogeneity of behavior and performance. In this article the Dr. Wilcox and his co-authors show that this heterogeneity is reliable and examine several potential sources of it, including cognitive ability and personality scales. The strongest predictors of both behavior and performance are two cognitive ability measures. The authors conclude that complete explanations of heterogeneity in dynamic decision making require attention to complexity and individual differences in cognitive constraints.

Faculty News & Notes, Dec. 2

Donald Guy, assistant professor, Department of Theatre, College of Performing Arts, recently served as lighting designer for the production The Magic of the Orient Express in Dallas. The show featured Master Magicians Kalin and Jinger (two-time Magicians of the Year) and comedy magician John Cassidy.

Tibor R. Machan, Ph.D., professor and holder of the R. C. Hoiles Chair in Business Ethics and Free Enterprise at the Argyros School, visited SUNY Buffalo and gave a talk on “Equality, Oh So Badly Misunderstood” to faculty and students of the philosophy department there on Friday, November 5. It was based on his forthcoming book with that title, from Addleton Academic Press.

Dr. Machan also delivered a talk on “The Tragedy of the Commons and the Calculation Problem: Two Sides, Same Coin?” at the Association for Global Business’s annual meeting in New Orleans on Nov. 12, 2010, to be published in the proceedings of the meeting.

The second edition of Dr. Machan’s 1975 book, Human Rights and Human Liberties, A Radical Reconsideration of the American Political Tradition, was just published by the University Press of America. In addition, his paper, “A Critique of Positive Rights,” will be included in Thomas Cushman, ed., The Routledge International Handbook of Human Rights (London and New York, Routledge, 2011).

Liz Maxwell, assistant professor, Department of Dance, College of Performing Arts, presented a paper in November as a part of the Working Group at the joint conference for Congress on Research in Dance and the American Society for Theatre Research held in Seattle. Her paper “The Relational Dialectic: Examining the Student/Teacher Dynamic Through Somatic Education” was part of a larger discussion focused on the topic of performance as research. The Working Group, formed four years ago, encourages interdisciplinary dialogue between artists and scholars and is grounded in what anthropologist Dwight Conquergood calls “performance as a way of knowing.”

Ronald L. Scott, Ph.D., has been awarded Professor Emeritus status. For his retirement reception in May, some of Dr. Scott’s colleagues, students and alumni collaborated on a 26-minute video retrospective of accomplishments in his 37 years in higher education. It can be viewed on the Chapman website at http://vimeo/11925853. Dr. Scott, a leading researcher and expert in psychological assessment, retired after 31 years at Chapman.

Alicia Okouchi-Guy, assistant professor of dance, was invited to conduct a seminar on “Working as a Professional Dancer and Choreographer” to the faculty and students in the Department of Dance at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.

Janie Park, D.M.A., adjunct professor of music and coordinator of secondary piano, Conservatory of Music, College of Performing Arts, recently performed two separate world premiere performances, one in Paraguay and the other closer to home, in Anaheim. On October 15 – 17, Dr. Park was invited by the National Symphony Orchestra of Paraguay to perform the piano solo movements of a world premiere ballet, commissioned by the government of Paraguay to celebrate the bicentennial of their country’s independence. The piece was written by brother and sister Paraguayan composers Nancy and Daniel Luzko. In September, Dr. Park was the featured pianist in a world premiere ensemble work with the Orange County Wind Symphony. The piece (Luz al Mar Oscuro) was written by American composer Joseph Cristina, and the concert was held at the Servite Theatre in Anaheim. This performance was part of “The Music of Latin America” Concert and was presented with the support of Argentine Promotions Center of Los Angeles in celebration of Argentina’s bicentennial, which also is this year.

Ramesh P. Singh, Ph.D., professor, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Schmid College of Science, organized a session on “Ocean-Related Natural Hazards” at PORSEC 2010 (the Pan Ocean Remote Sensing Conference) on October 22, 2010, in Keelung, Taiwan. He also gave a talk, “Changes in Ocean Color Associated with Dust Storms.” He was honored by the local organizing committee and PORSEC’s president for his contribution in the organization of the scientific session.

Dr. Singh is also an elected member of the Science Organizing Committee (SOC) of PORSEC. He attended an SOC meeting on October 21, 2010 and supported PORSEC’s Statement on Climate. He took the initiative to propose the venue of the next PORSEC 2012 meeting at Kochi, India, which was approved by the SOC. The theme of the next PORSEC 2012 meeting will be “The Ocean: Remote Sensing For the Well Being of All.”

Faculty News & Notes, Nov. 10

Eyal Amitai, Ph.D., associate professor in the School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, participated at the NASA Precipitation Measurement Missions (PMM) Science Team Meeting in Seattle, WA, Nov. 1-4. This meeting is for NASA’s PMM Science Team members, co-investigators and invitees.

Hesham El-Askary, Ph.D., assistant professor, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Schmid College of Science, just returned from a trip to Korea after giving two invited talks at the International Workshop on Environmental Geospatial Information hosted by the Korea Environment Institute. After the conference, Dr. El-Askary went to Korea University, Seoul, to give a talk about air pollution in Seoul.

Micol Hebron, assistant professor, Department of Art, Wilkinson College, presented a performance at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art on Sunday, Nov.7.  Her performance was part of a large event in which 50 different artists or artist groups ‘take over’ the museum for a day. All projects had something to do with food or eating, and many of them were audience participatory.

Nubar Hovsepian, Ph.D., associate professor, Department of Political Science, Wilkinson College, is on sabbatical this semester. While on sabbatical, he has traveled extensively to present his work at various venues. In October he participated in a conference sponsored by the Georg Eckert Institute in Braunschweig, Germany, on Education and Conflict: Perspectives from Israel/Palestine and presented a paper titled “The Context of the Palestinian Curriculum: Post-Conflict or Conflict?” The paper draws on Dr. Hovsepian’s book: Palestinian State Formation: Education and the Construction of National Identity (2008). The paper will be published in an edited volume. Also in October Dr. Hovsepian delivered lectures at UC Santa Barbara and Harvard University.

Anna Leahy, Ph.D., Department of English, Wilkinson College, has had her poem “After Assassination” published in the Summer/Fall 2010 issue of Crab Orchard Review. Dr. Leahy’s poem, “Rules for Writing a Poem,” was recently published in Cream City Review.

David Michael Lee, adjunct professor and staff, Wilkinson College, is participating in “Action (un)Packed: Abstraction After Action” at Commonspace, 2226 Whittier Blvd, Los Angeles, Nov. 13 from 5 to 7 p.m.

The inaugural exhibition of Commonspace brings together a number of emerging American painters engaged in investigating the inheritance of action painting at the opening of the 21st century. This packed salon style exhibition attempts to trace new strategies of speed, viscosity, virtuosity, geometricism, color vibration and mixed vocabularies of every kind that fall beyond the stratagems of neo-modernism and postmodernism. Action (un)Packed showcases painting practices that aren’t afraid of complexity or abjection, beauty or the ridiculous, but that actively demonstrate a dynamic negotiation between disparate regimes of pictorial signification.

Liliana Leopardi, Ph.D., assistant professor, Department of Art, Wilkinson College, will present an overview of the history of Venetian glass at Bowers Museum of Art at 2 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 21. Dr. Leopardi will focus on the invention of crystal, the quest to produce glass in imitation of precious materials and the magical properties used to repel poisons based off of the use of crystals. Glass making in Venice was of such importance that the Most Serene Republic protected its secrets by imposing heavy fines and imprisonment in its famous Galleon on those who dared break the law.

Louise Thomas, Ph.D., associate professor, Ph.D., associate professor, Conservatory of Music, College of Performing Arts, performed a live radio broadcast Friday, Oct. 29, from the historic Jascha Heifetz Studio at The Colburn School in downtown Los Angeles. Dr. Thomas performed a recital with violinist, Elizabeth Pitcairn, who owns the “Red Violin,” the extraordinary instrument that was portrayed in the movie “The Red Violin” featuring Samuel L. Jackson. The recital was broadcast live and recorded by Chicago’s long-running WFMT classical music station in their Chicago – LA live feature, and will soon appear online. Dr. Thomas is director of Keyboard Collaborative Arts in the College of Performing Arts.

William Wright, Ph.D., associate professor, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Schmid College of Science, gave an invited lecture to the Biology Department at California State University, Fullerton, titled “Bumper Cars in a Washing Machine: The Ecology of Tenacity in the Territorial Owl Limpet.” In his talk Dr. Wright described the recent research he and his students conducted on the behavioral ecology of a territorial marine snail. Dr. Wright and his team used field observations and experiments to develop an understanding of the risks of dislodgment in limpets during foraging and high-speed territorial chasing.

Faculty News & Notes, Oct. 26

Tibor R. Machan, Ph.D., professor and holder of the R. C. Hoiles Chair in Business Ethics and Free Enterprise at the Argyros School was a featured presenter at the European Students for Liberty Conference in Milan, October 11 & 12, 2010 (at Bocconi University, the great hall of Via Gobbi and in the lecture halls of the new Grafton Building). He spoke on “Liberty & Democracy, Friends or Foes?” and “Asserting One’s Value is a Prerequisite of Defending One’s Rights.” Machan’s essay, “Libertarianism versus Welfare Rights” will appear in James P. Sterba, ed., Morality: The Why and the What of It (NY: Columbia University Press, 2011).

Ramesh P. Singh, Ph.D., professor, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences has been invited by NASA Sounder Science Team to give an invited talk related to precursory signals observed from AIRS data at the NASA Sounder Science Team Meeting to be held in Maryland Nov. 3- 5, 2010.  The NASA Sounder Science Team invited Dr. Singh after his recent publication on the Wenchuan earthquake of May 2008.

 

Faculty News and Notes, Oct. 15

Donald Guy, assistant professor, Department of Theatre, College of Performing Arts, has been commissioned to serve as the lighting designer and production coordinator for the Festival Ballet Theatre’s production of Firebird & Mixed Repertoire on October 15-16 at the Irvine Barclay Theatre. This production features The Firebird choreographed by Nikolai Kabaniaev (Kirov Ballet), Intimate Conversations choreographed by Molly Lynch (Louisville Ballet), Oops! choreographed by Viktor Plotnikov (Boston Ballet) and Laurencia staged by Yuri Fateyev (Acting Director of the Mariinsky Ballet Company).

Baron Kelly, Ph.D., assistant professor, Department of Theatre, College of Performing Arts, has accepted an invitation to join the prestigious National Theatre Conference.  The induction ceremony will be held in New York at The Players Club on October 23.  Membership in the conference is by invitation only.  Founded in 1925, the NTC is a cooperative association of distinguished and influential leaders of the American theatre, both professional and university.  NTC operates as a theatrical “think tank” and meets to confer on matters pertaining to the welfare and development of the theatre.  “This is a great honor, and I am grateful to the NTC for extending their invitation,” says Kelly. “The opportunity to regularly meet with the best in my field will not only allow me to give back to my art but will allow me to bring some exciting new perspectives to my students as well.”

David Porter, Ph.D., professor, Economic Science Institute, and School of Computational Sciences, Schmid College, will be the session chair for “Asset Markets” and presenter for “Beat the Market and Polarized Portfolios” and “Affecting Policy by Manipulating Prediction Markets:  Experimental Evidence,” at the Southern Economic Association Annual conference November 20-22, 2010 in Atlanta, GA.

Dr. Porter, with Brice Corgnet, Ph.D., visiting professor with the Economic Science Institute, and Praveen Kujal, of Universidad Carlos III de Madrid,  will publish “ The Effect of Reliability, Content and Timing of Public Announcements on Asset Trading Behavior” in the  Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization’s November 2010 issue. In this paper the authors explore the effect of overwhelming daily announcements in financial markets. They used experimental asset markets to assess the impact of releasing public messages with different levels of reliability on asset prices. Subjects received qualitative announcements in predetermined trading periods that were either preset by the experimenter, randomly selected, or determined by past asset market prices. The full article can be found at: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science

Dr. Porter and Stephen Rassenti, PhD., professor, Economic Science Institute, and School of Computational Sciences, Schmid College, wrote “Combinatorial Auctions” which will be published in the Wiley Encyclopedia of Operations Research and Management Science 2010 edition. There are many issues that must be faced when designing an auction which involves multiple resources that must be simultaneously allocated when information concerning values for the various possible combined uses and constraints faced by the potential users is decentralized.  In this article they examine various auction formats used to allocate resources in these combinatorial settings.   While there is some consensus on the use of iterative combinatorial clock auctions for these types of allocation problems, many specific implementation issues are still open questions.

Faculty News & Notes, Oct. 8, 2010

Jason Bennett, Ph.D., College of Educational Studies, has been appointed Athletic Training Education Director. This promotion is the culmination of eight years of excellence in teaching, scholarly activities, advising and service to the athletic training profession, as well as to the university. Dr. Bennett was also awarded tenure and promoted to Associate Professor this past spring.

Grace Fong, Ph.D., director of keyboard studies, College of Performing Arts, has recently returned from her performance with the Indianapolis Chamber Orchestra, and the review of her performance by Tom Aldridge of NUVO Weekly stated, “I can’t imagine more satisfaction at the opening of Indy’s classical-music season then hearing Grace Fong guesting with any series. A year ago, this 2009 American Pianists Association Fellow shared her near matchless talents as a recital soloist at Butler University. This time she appeared with the Indianapolis Chamber Orchestra in the IHC’s Basile Theater, playing the Schumann A Minor Piano Concerto. In both, her seemingly effortless touch in coaxing all the music inherent in her selections made two especially memorable evenings for this listener. Moreover, Robert Schumann was at the height of his musical inspiration with this concerto. Fong seems to evoke near perfection in revealing every note through a controlled legato, gliding over the most difficult passages as though child’s play…”

Wenshan Jia, Ph.D., associate professor, Department of Communications Studies, Wilkinson, has been invited to join the Editorial Advisory board of the Asian Journal of Communication. Launched in 1990, AJC is jointly run by the Wee Kim Wee School of Communication and Information of Nanyang Technological University in Singapore and the Asian Media Information and Communication Centre (AMIC). It is published by Taylor & Francis.

David Kiddie, assistant professor, Department of Art, Wilkinson, recently had two consecutive solo exhibitions of his latest ceramic sculptures in “Out of Order” and “Out of Order Again” at 643 Project Space in Ventura, CA and the Napa Hall Gallery at Cal State University Channel Islands.  Kiddie’s latest sculptures are the outcome of his interest in the structural order of biological cellular elements seen in the microscopic realm.  Through a microscope, simple formed organisms such as bacteria and viruses can be seen in the act of mitosis and clustering as they congregate in patterned compositions.  Kiddie utilizes a large-scale format for his work to reveal a part of the microscopic world and its structural possibilities implying conceptual underpinnings related to chaos theory, offense, defense and infiltration.  Professor Kiddie is pleased with the positive and enthusiastic response expressed from the viewing public, saying “I was surprised particularly by the interest from faculty members at CSUCI from departments other than Art.”  Jerry Clifford, Professor of Physics at CSUSI who led his students through the exhibition commented that the exhibition helped his students “realize broader applications for the content in his intro course.”

Ky Kugler, Ph.D., College of Education Studies, has been promoted to Associate Dean of the CES after one year of being the Assistant Dean of Undergraduate Education and Director of the ATEP for the last 9 years.  Dr. Kugler ushered in a new era of the CU ATEP by spearheading its initial national accreditation in 2004, followed by its 10-year re-accreditation, the highest designation awarded to undergraduate programs in 2009.

Suzanne SooHoo, Ph.D., has been appointed as the Jack H. and Paula A. Hassinger Endowed Chair of Culture, Community and Collaboration in the College of Educational Studies.  The Hassinger Endowed Chair was established to foster the teaching of education, reflecting the global cultural awareness of these distinguished individuals.  Her work will involve developing collaborative scholarship projects bringing together students and faculty from across disciplines, also working with public and community intellectuals as well as distinguished national and international scholars, toward authentic and sustainable relationships within local, professional and international communities.

Nat Wilcox, Ph.D., professor, Economic Science Institute, has been appointed the “program director for econometric methods” in the Center for the Economic Analysis of Risk at Georgia State University. In his capacity at CEAR, he will organize all-plenary workshops related to econometrics as applied to risk, uncertainty and ambiguity.

In May 2010, Dr. Wilcox held the first workshop in Atlanta at Georgia State University. In January of 2011, he will hold the second workshop in Denver, immediately after the ASSA/AEA meeting there. Details are available at the workshop website.

This summer he gave invited papers at two international conferences, including  FUR XIV in Newcastle, UK, and a CBS and CEAR-sponsored workshop in Copenhagen, Denmark.

Kimberly White-Smith, Ph.D., assistant professor, College of Educational Studies has been named as the Assistant Dean of Undergraduate Studies.  Dr. White-Smith will bring her considerable talents to the new CES Bachelor of Arts major in Integrated Educational Studies.  The IES Program is structured to provide a wide variety of school, community and business.

Bart Wilson, Ph.D., published An Experimental Analysis of the Demand for Payday Loans in  The B.D. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, 10 (1) (Topics), Article 93.

Faculty News & Notes, Sept. 28, 2010

Paul Gulino, associate professor, Dodge College of Film and Media Arts, been invited to lecture and conduct screenwriting workshops at Interscenario 2010: An International Festival of Scriptwriters in Wroclaw, Poland in October. At the festival he’ll analyze films and work with competition winners on their screenplays. Last spring Gulino made four trips to Israel to write the screenplay for an animated feature film for Animation Lab, Inc., a Jerusalem-based animation studio.

Claudine Jaenichen, assistant professor, Department of Art, Wilkinson College, has five undergraduate students from her Information Design course who will be published in a special issue of the Information Design Journal covering topics in Healthcare. IDJ is a peer-reviewed international journal and an authoritative publication in the discipline of information design. Keely Misenhimer, Brooke Brisbois, Laura Croswaite, Kailah Ogawa, and Chase Conching completed a 4-week benchmark and completed redesigned prototypes for over-the-counter medicine packaging. The objective was to test the performance of existing packaging and address issues in both written and visual language to better articulate the usability and accessibility of information and communication.

Jamie Kough, adjunct faculty, Department of Art, Wilkinson College, worked this spring and summer as a set designer and prop person for the soon-to-be- released film Not Today, which is about a California college student’s adventures in Hyderabad, India.

Laszlo Lak, adjunct faculty, Department of Music, College of Performing Arts,has been invited by the Music Teachers Association, Long Beach Chapter, to present a lecture/recital on Oct. 6, 2010, featuring the music of Franz Liszt. The lecture will focus on the various contributions to piano techniques and inventions by Liszt, followed by a recital of master pieces.

Tibor R. Machan, Ph.D., professor and holder of the R. C. Hoiles Chair in Business Ethics and Free Enterprise at the Argyros School has announced that his article “Taxation: The Ethics of its Avoidance or Dodging” will be published in the journal Contemporary Readings in Law and Social Justice, Volume 2(2), 2010.  In addition, Dr. Machan’s  ”A Critique of Positive Rights,” will be included in Thomas Cushman, ed., The Routledge International Handbook of Human Rights (London and New York, Routledge, 2011).

Alicia Okouchi-Guy, assistant professor of dance, and Donald Guy, assistant professor of theatre, College of Performing Arts, recently produced, along with long-time friend and industry colleague Lloyd Reese, a documentary film showcasing the 20th Annual NAACP Theatre Awards Gala at the Directors Guild of America in Hollywood, CA. The documentary will serve to educate and inspire the community while promoting arts education. Upon completion, the film will be submitted to documentary film festivals.

Richard Turner, professor, Department of Art, Wilkinson College, recently completed work on a new public artwork for Market Square Park in Houston, Texas. The piece is a walkway inset with fragments of masonry from local buildings. Professor Turner was a member of the original artist team that designed the park in 1992. Changing demographics of the local area required new design programmed for more intense usage. His new work salvages material from the previous park walkways, which used material originally salvaged from historic buildings in downtown Houston. Professor Turner is currently working on a sculpture for the City of Long Beach Transit Authority.

Wenshan Jia, Ph.D., associate professor, Department of Communication Studies, Wilkinson College, delivered a keynote address titled “Sino-globalization and the Intercultural Paradigm of Management” at The First International Conference on Eastern-Western Cultures and Management cosponsored by the Research Center for Eastern-Western Cultures and Management and the Intercultural Research Institute, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China, June 18-20, 2010.

Dr. Jia was also invited as Guest Speaker on “Paradigms of Intercultural Research in Contemporary China” at the second part of the Sino-German Conference Series on Intercultural Communication at Shanghai International Studies University, Shanghai, China, June 14-17, 2010.

Other recent presentations include: a five-part lecture series “Frontiers of Intercultural Studies” featuring his own research accomplishments for the faculty of School of Journalism, People’s University of China, May 31-June 9, 2010; “The Impact of Values and Identities on Cross-Cultural Conflicts and their Management in Multinational Corporations” at the panel “the Intersections of Cultures, Communication and Conflicts in Organizational Settings: The Case Studies of China”, June Singapore, June 24, 2010; “Face (Image) vs. Power:  a Comparative Perspective on the American and Chinese Models of Global Communication” presented at the preconference “Chindia:  Implications for Global Communication, at the 2010 International Communication Association Annual Convention, Singapore, June 22-26, 2010; and an interview on “Towards Achieving a Breakthrough Development of Intercultural Communication Studies in China” on “Dialogues with Distinguished Scholars”, China Academy for Social Sciences Weekly Scholarly Journal published in Chinese on August 26, 2010 at http://www.sspress.cn/news/12753.htm

Dr. Jia has also won several book awards with colleague Cassie Lynch, including:

  • “Outstanding Academic Book” in Choice of American Library Association, 2010, with the chapter “An intercultural communication model of international relations:  the case of China” in Y. Hao & G. Wei (Eds.) Challenges to Chinese foreign policy:  diplomacy, globalization and the next world power (pp. 319-333).  Louisville, KT:  University Press of Kentucky;
  • “Outstanding Academic Book” in Choice of American Library Association, 2010, with an entry “Hu Jintao” (updated, revised and expanded for reprint). book Berkshire Encyclopedia of China edited by Linsun Cheng & Kerry Brown et al (Berkshire Publishing Group LLC. 2009) in which Wenshan Jia & Cassie Lynch published an entry “Hu Jintao” (updated, revised and expanded for reprint, pp. 1075-1077
  • “The Best Reference” from Library Journal, again for “Hu Jintao.”

Michael Pace, Ph.D., assistant professor, Department of Philosophy, Wilkinson College, has an article appearing in the most recent issue of Pacific Philosophical Quarterly. “Perceptual Foundational Justification and the Problem of the Speckled Hen” criticizes several prominent theories of how experiences give us knowledge of the world. (The criticism involves a thought experiment about seeing a hen with many speckles.) He then defends a novel theory of perceptual knowledge that solves the problem.

Faculty & Staff News, Sept. 17, 2010

Mark Axelrod, Ph.D., professor of English, Wilkinson, is serving as a film mentor for HATCH and its signature event, HATCHfest 2010, a film festival that will be held in Bozeman, Montana Sept. 22-25.  HATCH is a year-round non-profit organization, based in Bozeman, designed to develop and foster the growth of creative minds in various industries through mentorship, exposure, and networking.  Since its inception in 2004, HATCH has developed an environment, from HATCHfest to HATCHlabs that has engaged young artists’ creativity, connecting new filmmakers, musicians, photographers, designers, architects, writers and fine artists with award-winning veterans in the entertainment industry. Dr. Axelrod is a practicing screenwriter and has been awarded for his work by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; the Writers Guild of America, East; the Screenwriters Forum (University of Wisconsin); and the Sundance Institute. He has written over 20 screenplays and teleplays, and his adaption and co-production of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s An Author’s Mother won awards from the Scottish Associtaion of Filmmakers, the London International Film and Video Festival, and the Festival Internacional de Video do Algarve, Portugal. He is currently working on a project with the Chilean director Silvio Caiozzi, whose film Coronacion was short-listed for the 2001 Academy Awards. He has taught or conducted screenwriting seminars and workshops throughout Latin America, Europe and the United Kingdom as well as the United States and has written several books on the art of screenwriting.

Stephen Berens, assistant professor, Department of Art, Wilkinson, has an installation of large-scale photographs on exhibit at the Poor Farm, an international exhibition and artist residency program in Wisconsin. The installation consists of two 5’x12’ photographs shot approximately 45 feet apart looking out the front windows of the Poor Farm in March. In August the photographs were installed directly opposite the windows from which they were shot, flipping the landscape north to south and from midsummer to early spring. Since the images were produced using a robotic tripod head that allowed100 separate photographs of the site to be seamed together to form one image it allowed the viewer to see the landscape more clearly in its reproduction than by looking out the windows at the landscape itself. They will be displayed for one year allowing the relationship of the photograph to the view out the window to change as the landscape changes.

John Benitz, Ph.D., assistant professor of theatre, College of Performing Arts, was cast in an episode of a new Discovery Channel series currently titled Hargrove. He appeared as the title character, Dr. Thomas Hargrove, a man who was captured by Columbian militants in 1994 and held hostage, under incredibly harsh conditions, in the Andes for 11 months. Hargrove kept, and smuggled out, a secret diary that became the book Long March to Freedom, which inspired the movie Proof of Life. The episode is planned to air in February.

Hesham El-Askary, Ph.D., assistant professor of Earth System Science and Remote Sensing and Director Hazards, Global and Environmental Change Program has recently coauthored a paper titled “Study of the formation of the ‘Black Cloud’ and its dynamics over Cairo, Egypt using MODIS and MISR sensors” that has been accepted for publication in the prestigious Journal of Geophysical Research and is currently in press “http://www.agu.org/journals/jd/papersinpress.shtml#id2010JD014384“.

In this study data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) and the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) are used with meteorological data and trajectory analyses to determine the cause of these pollution events.    MODIS fire counts put the source as the burning of agricultural waste after harvest season in the Nile delta region.  Synchronous MISR data show that these fires create low altitude (<500 m) plumes of smoke and aerosols which flow over Cairo in a few hours, as confirmed by Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) forward trajectory analyses.”

Baron Kelly, Ph.D., assistant professor of theatre, College of Performing Arts, has just returned from consulting for The California Arts Project (TCAP) at San Diego State University.  He taught master classes and lectured on professional development in the teaching of acting techniques.  The California Arts Project’s central mission is to inspire teaching and learning in dance, music, theatre, and visual arts through its statewide and regional leadership and professional development centers.  TCAP serves as a learning community of educators, pre-kindergarten through university, with a focus on teacher as teacher, teacher as learner, teacher as leader, and teacher as artist.

Tibor Machan, who holds the R. C. Hoiles Chair in Business Ethics and Free Enterprise at the Argyros School, gave a two hour lecture/seminar for the Association of Certified Fraud Examiners OC Chapter and ISACA, OC Chapter, at The City Club, Orange County Medical Association Building, on Tuesday, Sept. 14. The topic was Business Ethics & Corporate Governance.

Dr. Machan’s discussion note, “Left-Libertarianism–An Oxymoron?”, will be published in Reason Papers #32.  (Machan is executive editor of the journal but has no hand in selecting papers to be published there.)
In addition, two new books by Dr. Machan are about to be published. Springer will bring out, in its Springer Briefs series, Why Is Everyone Else Wrong? Explorations in Truth and Reason, and Addleton Academic Publishers will publish his Equality, Oh So Misunderstood.

Alex Segade, adjunct faculty, Department of Art, Wilkinson, is part of a three-person art collective called My Barbarian that has a showing at Museo Experimental El Eco in Mexico City. To read in Spanish, the link is http://www.eleco.unam.mx/sitio/index.php/el-eco-contenido/individual/my_barbarian_en_el_eco/ For English, visit: http://www.eleco.unam.mx/sitio/index.php/eng-el-eco-content/individual/my_barbarian_en_el_eco/.

Faculty & Staff News, Sept. 9, 2010

Lia Halloran, assistant professor,  Department of Art, Wilkinson College of Humanities and Social Sciences, is co-curator of The Los Angeles Art Association’s exhibit, Measure for Measure, an unprecedented all-media exhibition at Gallery 825. The exhibit, conceptualized and curated by globally renowned Harvard Physicist Lisa Randall, Ph.D., opens Friday, Sept. 10, with a reception from 6 to 9 p.m. The gallery is at 825 N. La Cienega Blvd.

Lori Cox Han, Ph.D., professor, Department of Political Science, Wilkinson College of Humanities and Social Sciences, recently attended the annual American Political Science Association meeting in Washington, DC, where she presented a paper titled “A Moving Target: How the State of the News Industry Determines White House Communication Strategies.”  She also completed a four-year term on the executive board of Pi Sigma Alpha, the national political science honor society.

Atanas Radenski, Ph.D., professor of mathematics and computer science, School of Computational Sciences, Schmid College of Science, secured a teaching grant from Amazon.com. The grant provides credit of $1,200 to be used on the Amazon.com cloud computing platform, formally referred to as Amazon Web Services. The grant will support Chapman University students in a new course on High-Performance Computing. Specifically, students will be able to access the Amazon.com cloud to study – and experiment with – novel high-performance computing techniques.

Dr. Radenski also participated in WolrdComp’10 – the 2010 World Congress in Computer Science, Computer Engineering, and Applied Computing, Las Vegas, July 12-15, 2010. Dr. Radenski presented a paper on Enhancing Moodle with Heterogeneous Questions (co-authored with E. Stoeva) and chaired a session on Grid Computing.

Early this summer Dr. Radenski also participated in WG2: Adapting Moodle to Better Support CS Education at ITiCSE’10, the international conference on Technology and Innovation in Computer Science Education, Ankara, Turkey, June 26-30, 2010. Dr. Radenski worked with colleagues from TU Darmstadt, Germany; University of Florence, Italy; Aalto University, Finland; Alma College, USA; and Univ. Politecnica de Madrid, Spain. This international collaboration began online in spring 2010 and then continued at ITiCSE’10 in Ankara, where the group worked for 5 days. WG2 investigated how Moodle, as one of the most popular e-learning systems, can be better adapted to support the needs of computer science education. The group provided concrete guidance on desirable beneficial features and extensions. WG-2 prepared a technical report and submitted it for peer-review.

Can Uslay, Ph.D., assistant professor, Argyros School of Business and Economics, attended the Annual Research Symposium on Marketing and Entrepreneurship in Boston as a Kauffman Faculty Fellow last month. During the symposium he served as a panel member for a special session on “The Marketing/Entrepreneurship Interface – Past and Future Research.” Additionally, as Chair of the Awards Committee, he announced the winners of the 2010 Gerald E. Hills Best Paper Award during the main luncheon.

Faculty and Staff News, Aug. 31, 2010

Stephen Berens, assistant professor, Department of Art, Wilkinson College of Humanities and Social Sciences, returns to teaching after a development leave during which he was awarded a residency for the month of May at Stiching Kaus Australis, an international artist residency program in Rotterdam. Professor Berens was invited to be the first artist in residence at the studio of the late conceptual artist Sol LeWitt in Spoleto, Italy, in June.

Victoria Carty, Ph.D., assistant professor, Department of Sociology, Wilkinson College of Humanities and Social Sciences, recently published a book with Routledge Press titled, Wired and Mobilizing:  Social Movements, New Technology, and Electoral Politics.  The manuscript examines how new information technologies, including the Internet and new forms of social media, facilitate and enhance collective behavior to promote social change through both contentious and electoral processes.

Grace Fong, Ph.D., assistant professor and director of keyboard studies, College of Performing Arts, Conservatory of Music, has just returned from being faculty and guest performer at various music festivals, including the Innsbrook Institute Summer Festival in St. Louis, Mo., the Portland Chamber Summer Ensembles Festival, the Oregon Bach Festival, and a Festival of Music in Tuscany, Italy. This season, Dr. Fong has been invited to be soloist with the Indianapolis Chamber Orchestra, Phoenix Symphony, Tucson Symphony, and Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra, and will be doing a performance tour in Japan.

Baron Kelly, Ph.D., assistant professor, Department of Theatre, College of the Performing Arts, will be honored with a “Chance Visionary Award” by the Chance Theatre in Anaheim Hills at their annual gala on Sept. 18 for inspiring and inciting the next generation of theatre artists.  To view the article in the Orange County Register about the event, visit http://www.ocregister.com/news/chance-262219-theater-gala.html.

Christopher Kim, Ph.D., associate professor, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Scmid College of Science, just returned from a National Science Foundation-sponsored workshop in Washington, DC, titled “Future Directions in Geobiology and Low-Temperature Geochemistry.”  The entire geochemistry community was solicited for several months in advance to submit white papers of potential future research areas to workshop organizers, and Dr. Kim’s paper was selected as one of the top submissions for presentation at the workshop.  The goal of the workshop was to identify the big questions and exciting emerging research opportunities in Geobiology and Low-Temperature Geochemistry for the coming decade. After the presentations, all presenters developed and wrote text to contribute towards a National Research Council report on basic research opportunities that include all of Earth Sciences.

Faculty and Staff News, Aug. 19, 2010

Christopher Kim, Ph.D., associate professor in the School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Schmid College of Science, has been selected to become an associate editor of Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, the premier international geochemistry journal in the field.  Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta publishes research papers in a wide range of subjects in terrestrial geochemistry, meteoritics, and planetary geochemistry and has a 2009 impact factor of 4.385, placing it as the top-ranked geochemistry journal and the 6th highest among all geoscience journals (out of 272 titles) according to Journal Citation Reports.

Shari Young Kuchenbecker, Ph.D., assistant professor, Department of Psychology, Schmid College of Science, led a group of her students at the Annual Meeting of American Psychological Association held in San Diego this month, where they presented their research. Research topics included: What employers look for in hiring recent college grads; Effects of parent emotion coaching on preschoolers’ behavior as judged by teachers blind to the parents’ training; Nicaragua & Head Start preschool teachers empathy and time perspective; and Effects of cognitive framing on time perspective, empathy, and well being. Students attending the annual meeting were Rosezetta Henderson, Danny Pugh, Natalie Marley and Chelsea Huls.

Naveen Jonathan, Ph.D., assistant professor, Department of Psychology, Schmid College of Science, has been elected to the National Council of the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy (AAMFT).  Chapman’s MA program for Marriage and Family Therapy is nationally accredited by AAMFT, and Dr. Naveen primarily teaches in this MA program in the School of Health & Life Sciences in the Schmid College of Science. The MA-MFT program currently has 65 enrolled students.

Faculty & Staff News & Notes, Aug. 13, 2010

Dr. Eyal Amitai, associate professor in the new School of Earth and Environmental Sciences at Chapman University was invited to convene and chair the American Geophysical Union General Session on Precipitation at the 2010 Meeting of the Americas.  The meeting was held August 8-12, 2010 at Foz do Iguaçu, Brazil.  A union-wide science program covered topics in all areas of geophysical sciences.  Amitai gave a talk on “Systematic Anomalies in Rainfall Intensity Estimates Over the Continental U.S.”

The area’s most famous attraction is the Iguaçu Falls, one of the great natural wonders of the world, and the attractions is also on the UNESCO World Heritage List.  The Falls have a tremendous amount of water with a flow capacity that is equal to three times that of Niagara Falls.  The waterfall system consists of 275 falls along 2.7 kilometers (1.67 miles) of the Iguazu River.  The Devil’s Throat, a U-shaped, 82-meter-high, 150-meter-wide and 700-meter-long (490 by 2300 feet) cataract, is the most impressive of all, and marks the border between Argentina and Brazil.

Faculty & Staff News & Notes, Aug. 12, 2010

Chapman University Department of Theatre faculty members were very active at the annual Association for Theatre in Higher Education (ATHE) conference, held this year for the first time in Los Angeles.  The ATHE Conference brought together more than 900 theatre educators and artists from around the world Aug. 3-6, 2010.  Department of Theatre Chair Nina LeNoir, who served as vice president for Conference 2010 and was instrumental in planning and organizing this year’s conference, also presented during a panel on “Assessing the Student Actor: A Rubric for Defining Expectations When Teaching the Actor’s Art” and with fellow  Assistant Professor John Benitz and several other theatre educators in a lively roundtable discussion titled “In a Multi-Media Marketplace, Are Our Traditional Acting Programs on a Path to Extinction?”  In addition, Assistant Professor Baron Kelly, Ph.D. engaged audiences as one of the principal actors in a staged reading of the David Mark Cohen Award-winning play, The Power Behind the Palette.

Faculty & Staff News & Notes, July 30, 2010

Ramesh P. Singh, Ph.D., professor, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Schmid College of Science, edited “Satellite Observations of the Wenchuan Earthquake of 12 May 2008, a special issue of International Journal of Remote Sensing, published by Taylor and Francis, UK. This special issue was published July 13, 2010, and contains 23 papers by scientists working in China, US, Japan, Europe, Taiwan, India and Russia, dealing with the changes on land, atmosphere, meteorological and ionosphere observed by remote sensing satellites and ground GPS.  The May 12, 2008 Wenchuan earthquake killed about 68,000 people, damaged thousands of buildings and led to huge property losses. This earthquake was felt in the radius of more than 1,000 miles. The papers published in this special issue show how satellite remote sensing data is useful in mapping damages caused by deadly earthquakes and how the remote sensing data is useful in managing rescue operations.

Faculty & Staff News & Notes, July 23, 2010

Logan Esdale, Ph.D., assistant professor, Wilkinson College of Humanities and Social Sciences, Department of English, has published an essay in the Spring 2010 issue of Textual Cultures (issue 5.1), titled “The Saintsbury Years of Marianne Moore.” It offers a new reading of Moore’s mid-career poetics, in particular how she turned to George Saintsbury’s work and to him personally (through correspondence) as she further developed a social poetics: for Moore, the intertextual was interpersonal. Dr. Esdale has also published a review essay in the journal Textual Practice (June 2010; issue 24.3), and in August he will travel to Oxford University to deliver a paper at The Emily Dickinson International Society Conference. His paper is titled “Adornment Practice in Dickinson’s Studio.”

Anna Leahy, Ph.D., associate professor, Wilkinson College of Humanities and Social Sciences, Department of English, recently had a chapter titled “Teaching as a Creative Act” published in Does the Writing Workshop Still Work?, part of the New Writing Series by Multilingual Matters. Her piece echoes the call to be nerds that she issued in her talk at the Sigma Tau Delta induction this past spring. Additionally, Leahy’s conversation essay with poet Larissa Szporluk, titled “Good Counsel,” appears in the 30th Anniversary Issue of Mid-American Review.

Faculty & Staff News & Notes July 16, 2010

Eyal Amitai, Ph.D., associate professor in the new School of Earth and Environmental Sciences accepted an invitation to visit Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya in Barcelona, Spain, and to serve as a jury in Mr. Xavier Llort PhD defense.  Llort is studying the structure of radar rainfall and its errors.  His dissertation, written in English, should be useful for many scientists and students around the world both in academic institutions and in leading research and operational agencies (e.g., NASA and NOAA).  Minutes after his defense on June 28, Llort received the highest Ph.D. grade available–excellent with a cum laude honor.

Having external examiner plays an important role in many universities.  The expert in the field of research should be external to the university.  However, inviting experts from overseas (and fully supporting their travel costs as done in this case) is not common. In Spain, doctoral degrees are regulated by royal decree. They are granted by the University on behalf of the King, and the diploma has the force of a public document.  The Ministry of Science keeps a National Registry of Theses called TESEO.   According to the National Institute of Statistics (INE), less than 5 percent of MS degree holders are admitted to Ph.D. programs, and less than 10 percent of first-year Ph.D. students are finally granted a doctorate.  All doctoral programs are of research nature.  The social standing of doctors in Spain is evidenced by the fact that only Ph.D. holders, Grandees and Dukes can take seat and cover their heads in the presence of the King.

Dr. Amitai also has accepted an invitation to visit NOAA/National Severe Storm Laboratory (NSSL) in Norman Oklahoma.  Eyal presented “Verification of NASA’s Precipitation Products Using NOAA NMQ” at the NSSL Colloquium at the National Weather Center on July 13.  NMQ is a new set of high-resolution products of precipitation fields over the entire continental US based on ground observations, which is generated by NSSL.  NASA has accepted Dr. Amitai’s recommendation to have the NMQ as official products for validation of the future Global Precipitation Measurement mission (GPM).  Eyal’s visit to NSSL is expected to tighten the ongoing collaboration between NASA and NOAA for improving precipitation estimates from space and ground platforms.  Chapman University is currently a lead institution on two research grants awarded by NASA in which scientists from NASA and NOAA are collaborating.

Doug Cooney, adjunct professor of journalism and creative writing, has received the American Alliance for Theatre & Education’s Charlotte B. Chorpenning Playwright Award. The award honors a nationally known writer of outstanding plays for children and recognizes a body of work. It is named in honor of playwright Charlotte B. Chorpenning of the Goodman Theatre in Chicago. Cooney will be honored at the annual AATE awards ceremony Saturday, Aug. 7, at the PARC 55 Hotel in San Francisco and will teach feature writing during the Fall ‘10 semester.

Lori Cox Han, Ph.D., professor, Wilkinson College of Humanities and Social Sciences, Department of Political Science, Professor has just published: “Women and US Politics: The Spectrum of Political Leadership,” 2nd ed., Lynne Rienner Publishers.

Tibor R. Machan, Ph.D., professor and holder of the R. C. Hoiles Chair in Business Ethics and Free Enterprise at the Argyros School gave two talks at the Free Minds 2010 Conference, in Washington, DC, July 6-7, one on the difference between the economist’s and the ethical egoist’s conception of the human self and self-interest, and a second on “Affinities between Objectivism and Mainstream Contemporary Philosophy.”  He will make presentations in Gummersbach, Germany, July 12-13 and 16 for the Institute of Economic Affairs, Europe, and give two talks at Braunschweig Technical University in Germany on July 14. Finally, he will be in Budapest on July 22 for the release of the Hungarian translation of his book, A Brief on Business Ethics, Essential Issues.

Angela Tumini, assistant professor of Italian studies recently had her book “Gabriele D’Annunzio: Myth and Magic of Abruzzo in his Soul” re-printed in English from its original version in Italian by Verlag Publishing Company. The book talks about the influence of the Folklore and traditions of the native Italian region of the author on his writings. In addition to that, Dr. Tumini’s essay on the cinema of Lars von Trier and its analogies with Italian Futurism, “Let’s Kill the Moonlight in Electric Park: A Futuristic Interpretation of Lars Von Trier and Thomas Vintenberg’s Dear Windy” was published in Film International. The essay is part of the ongoing research that Dr. Tumini is doing on the analogies between Von Trier’s cinema and Italian cinema and culture. As part of her research, Dr. Tumini has just returned to the California from Copenhagen to interview Lars von Trier at his Zentropa Film Studios.

Faculty and Staff News & Notes July 9, 2010

Stephen Berens and Micol Hebron, assistant professors, Wilkinson, Department of Art, have been selected to have their video works shown at the premiere exhibition of the new Stadsmuseum, in Gent, Belgium, in October 2010. Their videos are part of the internationally acclaimed City One-Minute project which has shown in numerous countries, including at the Shanghai Exposition 2010.

Faculty and Staff News & Notes July 1, 2010

Lori Cox Han, Ph.D., professor, Wilkinson College of Humanities and Social Sciences,&nbsp; department of political science, was just published in Women and US Politics: The Spectrum of Political Leadership, 2nd ed., Lynne Rienner Publishers.

Baron Kelly, Ph.D., assistant professor, College of Performing Arts, department of theatre, has just returned from performing his one man show Ira Aldridge: Man of Many Parts at the Hungarian Academy of Science in Pecs, Hungary. Dr. Kelly also gave lecture/demonstrations at the University of Pecs for the Multi-Ethnic Studies: Europe and America Conference. Dr. Kelly’s research presentation was so enthusiastically received that he is now in negotiations with Dr. Rose Hsiu-li Juan of National Chung Hsing University in Taiwan to give a series of lecture/demonstrations in November.&nbsp; In addition, Dr. Ewa Luczak of Warsaw University in Poland has invited Dr. Kelly to be a guest speaker at her institution in 2011.

Tibor R. Machan, Ph.D., professor and holder of the R. C. Hoiles Chair in Business Ethics and Free Enterprise at the Argyros School and a regular columnist for the Orange County Register, will have his latest book, Equality, So Badly Misunderstood, published this year by Addleton Academic Publishers, of New York, New York.

Ramesh P. Singh, Ph.D., professor, Schmid College of Science, Earth system sciences and remote sensing, was elected as a member of the PACON (The Pacific Congress on Marine Science and Technology)Board of Directors. Dr. Singh joins 15 other members on the board, including representatives from the United States, Japan, Korea, China and Taiwan. PACON International is dedicated to sharing scientific and technical information on the world’s oceans and coastal regions to advance marine science and technology and its’ utilization in ocean policy formation, and the sustainable development of the world’s Oceans, through education and public programs.

Doug Sweet, instructor and director of Undergraduate Writing for Wilkinson College of Humanities and Social Sciences, has been invited to contribute to a written symposium on teacher quality for WPA Journal (Writing Program Administrators), Fall 2010.

Faculty News & Notes Notes, June 24, 2010

Marliyn Harran, Ph.D., Stern Chair in Holocaust Education and director of the Rodgers Center for Holocaust Education, has been re-elected to her third term on the governing board of the international Association of Holocaust Organizations (AHO).The AHO was established in 1985 to serve as an international network of organizations and individuals for the advancement of Holocaust education, remembrance and research. Among its functions and services are annual conferences held every June, a winter seminar at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum held every January, co-sponsorship of other conferences and seminars, a listserv for members, a website and the publication of an annual directory.

There are also regional branches which meet independently.  The AHO is governed by a nine-member board of directors, which is elected by and from the membership at its annual business meeting. The term of office is three years.

Micol Hebron, assistant professor, College of Performing Arts, has several projects underway this summer. Hebron presented a paper on contemporary American video art at the Annual Conference of Fine and Performing Arts at the Athens Institute of Education and Research in Athens, Greece, from June 7 – 10.

Hebron also has work in several shows throughout Southern California, including:

  • “Hollywood Merchmart,” June 21 to Sept. 26 at Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions. Hebron was also curate for two Chapman art students included this show, Sydney Snyder and Ashley McPeek. Admission is free.
  • “Fast Forward,” a screening of contemporary American video art at 7 p.m. Thursday, July 1, at the Santa Barbara Contemporary Arts Forum.
  • “Love Letters to a Surrogate,” a program of new video and performance art, at the from noon to 5 p.m., Saturday, July 10, at the Torrance Art Museum,
  • “Perform Now #2,” July 28 to Aug. 1 at the Performance Art Festival in Chinatown, Los Angeles.

Some of Hebron’s work can be viewed at Jancar Gallery in Los Angeles.

Christopher Kim, Ph.D., associate professor, Schmid College of Science, Earth and Environmental Sciences, and director of Chapman University’s Environmental Geochemistry Lab, recently returned from the 20th Annual International Goldschmidt Geochemistry Conference, held this year in Knoxville, Tenn.

There he gave an oral presentation on research being conducted in his group titled (Micro)spectroscopic Investigations of Arsenic Speciation Trends in Mine Wastes and oversaw poster presentations by current lab members James Dale, Jessey Francies, Suzie Shdo, and John Stegemeier, who also attended the conference.

Also of historical importance to the Environmental Geochemistry Lab was the presence of two former members, Chris Lentini and Brian Reinsch, who are Ph.D. candidates in environmental engineering at Harvard University and Carnegie-Mellon University, respectively.

Support from the Office of Undergraduate Research, the Virginia Carson Travel Grant, and the new School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, helped the team attend this important conference.

Tibor R. Machan, Ph.D., professor and holder of the R. C. Hoiles Chair in Business Ethics and Free Enterprise at the Argyros School and a regular columnist for the Orange County Register, has published “Capitalism via Science and Morality,” in Geopolitics, History, and International Relations 2(1), 2010:29-46.

Liz Maxwell, assistant professor of dance, College of Performing Arts, will present an interactive workshop at the Eighth International Conference on New Directions in the Humanities.  Her presentation includes a paper discussing the ability to determine decision making style through movement behavior patterns.  Expounding on the work of Rudolf Laban and Warren Lamb, Professor Maxwell has applied these ideas to the creative process in a presentation titled “Decisions in Art Making: An Illustration Through Dance.” The conference will be held at UCLA at the end of June.

Faculty News & Notes, June 11, 2010

Jason Bennett, Ph.D., associate professor, College of Educational Studies (CES), has been appointed Athletic Training Education Program Director, effective June 1, 2010. This promotion is the culmination of eight years of excellence in teaching, scholarly activities, advising and service to the athletic training profession, as well as to the university. Dr. Bennett was also awarded tenure and promoted to Associate Professor this past spring.

Christopher Kim, Ph.D., associate professor, Department of Chemistry, Schmid College of Science, gave an invited seminar presentation on arsenic contamination in gold mines at Wellesley College to undergraduates and faculty members in Wellesley’s Summer Science Research Program, which supports over 100 undergraduate students to spend the summer conducting scientific research on campus with faculty members.

Ky Kugler

Ky Kugler, Ph.D., former director of the Athletic Training Education Program (ATEP), has been promoted to Associate Dean of the College of Educational Studies. Dr. Kugler ushered in a new era at Chapman’s ATEP by spearheading its initial national accreditation in 2004, followed by its 10-year re-accreditation, the highest designation awarded to undergraduate programs, in 2009.

Liliana Leopardi, Ph.D., was an invited speaker at a conference on Carlo Crivelli held in Ascoli Piceno and Montefiore dell’Aso, Italy, on June 5th, 2010. Her paper, “Fra Rito ed Ornamento: Carlo Crivelli come pittore ed interprete della religiosita’ Marchigiana” addressed the close relationship between the artist and the dictates on ornament preached by the 15th century friar Jacopo della Marca.”

One of Dr. Leopardi’s students, alumna Karlie Harstad, delivered her paper on the Status of Contemporary Artin Athens, Greece, based on her senior thesis, at the International Conference on Contemporary Art held in Athens in June 2010.

 

Faculty News & Notes, June 11, 2010

Amer El-Ahraf, Ph.D., professor of Arabic, Wilkinson College of Humanities and Social Sciences, Department of Languages, is the editor of a children’s book authored by one of his Arabic language students, Julie Alexan. The book is titled Rania and Samir’s Puppets or in Arabic, Rania Wa Arogazat Samir. In addition to being a children’s book, it is intended as a learning tool for students. It is written in sections in both Arabic and English with a glossary for each section and a comprehensive glossary for the entire book. Julie started Dr. Amer El-Ahraf’s language classes with a limited capacity in Arabic. But she is now preparing for her second book in the series, which Dr. El-Ahraf will continue to edit.

Tibor R. Machan, Ph.D., professor and holder of the R. C. Hoiles Chair in Business Ethics and Free Enterprise at the Argyros School and a regular columnist for the Orange County Register, appeared on Crosstalk, the flagship program of Russia Today TV, an English-language news station with a bureau in Orange County. Dr. Machan appeared on a panel with participants from Yale University and Reason Magazine, discussing government regulations as they relate to food quality and obesity issues

Faculty News & Notes, May 21, 2010

Jason Keller, Ph.D., assistant professor, Schmid College of Science recently presented an invited talk titled, “Changes in anaerobic carbon metabolism in the tidal marsh experiment,” as part of a symposium hosted by the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center.  This symposium brought together thirty scholars who have worked to explore how plants, soils and insects are likely to respond to increases in atmospheric CO2 concentrations at two long-term elevated CO2 experiments in Florida and Maryland.  The proceedings of this symposium will be published by the Smithsonian Institute.

Liliana Leopardi, Ph.D., assistant professor, College of Performing Arts, Department of Art, delivered her paper, “Magical Properties of Gems and the Humanist Reception,” at the annual International Congress for Medieval Studies on Thursday, May 13, in Kalamazoo, Mich. The paper discussed gems and their magical properties as tools to construct self-identity in Renaissance Italy.

Tibor R. Machan, Ph.D., professor and holder of the R. C. Hoiles Chair in Business Ethics and Free Enterprise at the Argyros School and a regular columnist for the Orange County Register, announced that his book, Generosity, Virtue in Civil Society (Cato Institute, 1998), was translated into Italian this May with the title: Generosita, Virtu civile (Italy: Liberilibri, 2008).

 

Faculty News & Notes, May 14, 2010

Don Guy, assistant professor, College of Performing Arts, Department of Theatre, and Alicia Okouchi-Guy, assistant professor, College of Performing Arts, Department of Dance, have been commissioned by the Operafestival di Roma as the lighting designer and the choreographer for the opera Die Fledermaus this July in Rome, Italy.  Both professors will be bringing several of their Chapman students to work on and perform in this full-length opera.  Professor Guy will be bringing technical theatre students Trevor Weil (‘12), Maisie Chan (‘12), Christine Wille (‘11), and Jenny Ludwig (‘11); and professor Alicia Okouchi-Guy will be bringing dance majors Katy Grebing (‘10), Keely Misenhimer (‘12), Kylie Chilton (‘12), and Alexi Theador (‘13).  The Chapman students will have the opportunity to collaborate with other students from around the world and study with an international faculty of professional artists. The three-week residency will culminate with performances to be held in the historic Palazzo della Sapienza.

Baron Kelly, Ph.D., College of Performing Arts, Department of Theatre, was invited to give a lecture on May 10 about the 19th-century African-American Shakespearean actor Ira Aldridge to the Shakespeare Society of Laguna Woods.  Dr. Kelly also performed excerpts from his one man show Ira Aldridge: Man of Many Parts. Later in the week, he flew to New York City to begin working on a project with the acting division at the Juilliard School.
Tibor R. Machan, Ph.D., professor and holder of the R. C. Hoiles Chair in Business Ethics and Free Enterprise at the Argyros School, announced that his paper titled “Contemporary Anti-Natural Rights” will be published in Contemporary Readings in Law and Social Justice 2(1), 2010. It addresses the gradual drift from a natural rights to a conventionalist-pragmatists jurisprudence among prominent American jurists (e.g., Harvard Law’s and Obama advisor/former colleague, Cass Sunstein). In his paper Machan disputes the wisdom of this trend.

Anna V. Wilson, Ph. D., associate professor, College of Educational Studies, presented the following paper at the annual conference of the American Educational Research Association conference in Denver, Colo., April 30 to May 4,:

“Wrestling with the Conundrum of Sexual Identity:  Rights of Naming or “The Shape Shifting of Lesbian Identity” which was part of the panel “Contemporary Approaches to Curriculum Theorizing” — The papers in this panel offer a range of examples of scholars using curriculum theory to address historical and contemporary issues related to cultural practices.

Together Dr. Wilson and her doctoral student Veronica Bloomfield presented:”Speaking the Unspoken: A Dialogic Conversation about Whiteness” which was part of the panel  Crossing Border Terrains: Cultural Response, Embracing Change, and Community Memories — Each of these presentations from the Critical Issues in Curriculum & Cultural Studies SIG contributes to our ongoing conversations regarding non-dominant communities, whiteness, theories of identity, and the role of the indigenous researcher. Dr. Wilson was also elected Co-Chair of the Queer Studies Special Interest Group (SIG) – a two year term.  And on May 14 she gave a presentation at the Leatherby Libraries titled “Sister, Aunt and Friend:  Lesbian Families through a Historical Lens.”