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With Designs on Discovery

August 28, 2017 by | Chapman Now

From the colorful packaging on grocery store shelves to the dynamic imagery on movie posters and even the life-saving info on disaster-readiness materials, examples of dynamic graphic design are all around us. And so are practitioners of this thriving art form, including those in the Chapman Family. So we at Chapman Magazine decided to invite

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Geniuses Don’t Look Like Me Before reaching the peak of success at Chapman, the Cheverton Award winner first had to scale a mountain of self-doubt.

August 28, 2017 by | Chapman Now

It’s hard to imagine that Taylor Lee Patti ’17 was ever afraid of anything. After all, this is a scholar who triple-majored her way through Chapman University, recently earning degrees in physics, math and Spanish. Going where few undergrads dare, she gave a talk on her research to the American Physical Society and guest-lectured at the

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The Science of Breakthrough

August 28, 2017 by | Chapman Now

“The new Center for Science and Technology will allow us to expand the range of different questions we can ask. We already are asking important questions, and doing important research to answer them. But the new Center will allow us to be more expansive in our exploration. I think that’s true of all Chapman researchers.”

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Reeling in the Years Art students embrace a tool of film industry promotion, designing posters that highlight a growing Chapman legacy.

August 28, 2017 by | Chapman Now

The project is inspired by Hollywood, but right from the start it has been all about realizing singular visions of Chapman. Since 2010,  students in Art 430 – Advanced Graphic Design – have taken up the challenge of creating an official University poster, in the spirit of those displayed outside theatres to artfully draw us

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Hand in Hand At Launch Labs, budding entrepreneurs incubate ideas in “a cool little ecosystem where everyone is helping each other.”

May 26, 2017 by | Chapman Now

There’s chatter down the halls. In one room, a team strategizes how best to market its new software. In another, someone tests a virtual-reality game as a teammate gathers important data on bugs and glitches. Everyone is perfecting their products. In the Launch Labs, Chapman University’s startup incubator, there’s always someone working and always someone

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The Wonders of Slime Student researchers reach deep into the slippery world of the hagfish, chasing insights that hold gobs of promise.

May 26, 2017 by | Chapman Now

The first time she saw one, Lauren Friend ’19 was repelled. “Maybe even disgusted,” she says. But over time, she has developed a healthy respect for her research subject, the humble hagfish, which despite its slimy appearance and scavenging nature wiggles its way into the hearts of researchers by steering them toward scientific breakthroughs. “You

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‘It Just Feels Like Home’ Chapman’s new Cross-Cultural Center welcomes students eager to bridge divides and foster inclusion.

May 26, 2017 by | Features

After the years of planning, after all those discussions and questions that started with “should” or “would” or “what if” and were freighted with serious thoughts, concerns and hopes about Chapman University’s new Cross-Cultural Center, there is a funny little thing going on that no one expected. Food appears. It’s not too mysterious. Leftovers happen

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Beside the Golden Door Message from Chapman President Daniele Struppa

May 26, 2017 by Daniele C. Struppa | Uncategorized

This column will not examine the legality of the so-called travel-ban executive order, and I will not discuss its policy implications. Rather, I want to offer my personal story. I think it will be self-explanatory. Back in 1977, I received my mathematics degree from the University of Milano in Italy. I absolutely wanted to become

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Flipping a Term of Icy Intent

May 26, 2017 by Tom Zoellner | First Person

Just as the term “fake news” was in the American vocabulary for about five minutes before it was flipped on its head, I am hopeful the pejorative term “snowflake” as applied to college students might soon be reversed and applied to its users. It’s not just that the word is smug and patronizing. It is