13 posts tagged

IFREE/ESI Lecture Series

  

The IFREE/ESI Lecture Series Presents Matt McCarter, Ph.D. – “The size of social dilemma science”

December 4, 2013 by | Economic Science Institute

Abstract: The social dilemma paradigm is popular across many domains of the social sciences because it is a metaphor for understanding the practically significant problem of resource scarcity in organizations, communities, and nations. However, there is a “significant difference” between findings being statistically significant and practically significant. Using the population of empirical social-dilemma articles published from

The IFREE/ESI Lecture Series Presents Juan Carrillo, Ph.D. – “Neuroeconomic Theory: Using Neuroscience to Understand the Bounds of Rationality”

November 26, 2013 by | Economic Science Institute

Value computation and value modulation: a dual-process theory of self-control Abstract: We develop a theory of self-control based on a dual process approach. One brain system computes the goal value of consumption and another brain system can modulate this value by exerting costly self-control, thereby incorporating high-order considerations in the decision (e.g., healthiness or long

The IFREE/ESI Lecture Series Presents William Gates, Ph.D. – “Mechanism Design for Military Force Management ”

November 19, 2013 by | Economic Science Institute

Watch lecture Abstract: All elements of the defense department’s budget face scrutiny as military funding decreases. Military compensation is an attractive target because it represents approximately one third of the defense budget. Our research examines mechanisms to improve several areas of military compensation, particularly emphasizing retention, separation, and assignment incentives. This paper proposes a reverse

The IFREE/ESI Lecture Series Presents David Malueg, Ph.D. – “The Best-Shot All-Pay (Group) Auction with Complete Information”

October 28, 2013 by | Economic Science Institute

Oct. 11, David Malueg, Ph.D.  – The Best-Shot All-Pay (Group) Auction with Complete Information Abstract : We analyze an all-pay group contest problem in which individual members’ efforts are aggregated via the best-shot technology and the prize is a public good for the winning group. The interplay of within-group free-riding and across-group competition allows for

The IFREE/ESI Lecture Series Presents: Dr. David Stephens, “The Natural History of Acquisition: Evolution, foraging, impulsiveness and behavioral plasticity.”

September 21, 2012 by | Economic Science Institute

Sept. 21st, David Stephens, Ph.D. – The Natural History of Acquisition: Evolution, foraging, impulsiveness and behavioral plasticity. Further reading for this lecture. Abstract: The animals, including humans, descend from an ancient lineage of resource acquiring organisms: i.e. foragers.  This talk will focus on how this evolutionary history has shaped the mechanisms of decision-making.  The talk

IFREE/ESI Lecture Series Presents: Dr. Gary Charness “Experimental Games on Networks”

September 7, 2012 by | Economic Science Institute

Sept. 7th, Gary Charness, Ph.D. – Experimental Games on Networks Abstract: We study behavior and equilibrium selection in experimental network games. We vary two important factors: (a) actions are either strategic substitutes or strategic complements, and (b) subjects have either complete or incomplete information about the structure of a random network. Play conforms strongly to

IFREE/ESI Lecture Series Presents: Dr. Yan Chen “Crowdsourcing with All-pay Auctions: a Field Experiment on Taskcn”

August 31, 2012 by | Economic Science Institute

Aug. 31st, Yan Chen, Ph.D. – Crowdsourcing with All-pay Auctions:  a Field Experiment on Taskcn Abstract:To understand the effects of incentives on crowdsourcing participation and submission quality, we conduct a field experiment on Taskcn, a large Chinese crowdsourcing site using all-pay auction mechanisms. We systematically vary the size of the reward, and the presence of

IFREE/ESI Lecture Series Presents: Sean Crockett, Ph.D. – Do Reference Dependent Preferences Really Matter?

April 13, 2012 by | Economic Science Institute

Apr. 13th, Sean Crockett, Ph.D. – Do Reference Dependent Preferences Really Matter? Bio:  Sean Crockett is an assistant professor in the Department of Economics and Finance at Baruch College, City University of New York.  He received his Ph.D. from Carnegie Mellon University in 2004 and was a postdoc  at Caltech for two years afterward.  His

IFREE/ESI Lecture Series Presents Max Krasnow, Ph.D.

March 23, 2012 by | Economic Science Institute

Mar. 23rd, Max Krasnow, Ph.D. – Evolution of direct reciprocity under uncertainty can explain human generosity in one-shot encounters Abstract: Are humans too generous? The discovery that subjects choose to incur costs to allocate benefits to others in  anonymous, one-shot economic games has posed an unsolved challenge to models of economic and

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